Apr 25, 2019

HibiscusAfter a delightful winter in the Bahamas, we decided at the end of March to head for the US. The weather continued to get hotter and the humidity was climbing daily. It was tough to drop the mooring ball, but we were suddenly excited about starting the trek home. We left Man-O-War on Saturday, spent one night in Treasure Cay, soaking up the rays on the beach, then four nights in Green Turtle. It was in Green Turtle that we realized we had spun the hub in the propeller of our dependable dinghy engine, a 9.9 Mercury. More on that later.  We met Janice and Harley on Folly and another Canadian boat called Mariposa, and together we sailed to Great Sale Cay, 50 miles away.

The hibiscus flowers were right at their peak when we left.

Saturday morning, early, we all left Great Sale and motored west on flat calm waters. Within an hour, Pat noticed black discharge water and the engine would not throttle up. Great Sale Cay is the middle of nowhere...50 miles west of Green Turtle Cay, 45 miles north east of Freeport and 130 miles from the Florida coast. Not a good place to break down. Yikes!


Adamant's engine sits below the cabin sole, amidships. Pat flew down below and removed the engine covers.  What initially looked like clouds of smoke was actually steam (after a few missed heartbeats!) and the engine compartment was filling up with water (a few more missed heartbeats!). He yelled up to me to stop the engine; water was spraying all over the cabin.  We used the whale gusher pump, the bilge pump and the dinghy pump and got most of the water out. Then Pat shut off the water supply to the engine and disconnected the electrical because the solenoid was arcing. Eventually he discovered one missing screw on the impeller plate and two other screws had the heads stripped off. That was where the water was coming in...salt water! Folly had come alongside to help if needed and when we were sure we weren't going to sink, we set sail, but just drifted sideways...there wasn't any wind.  

Beautiful GardenFolly had left, but when he checked on us after an hour and heard we hadn't moved, he returned and took us in tow. Mariposa offered to share the tow, but we told him to keep going. By 4pm, the wind was freshening, so we opted to sail and sent Folly on his way. It took four more frustrating hours before there was enough wind to sail, but sail we did....after three or four sail changes and a lot of aggravation! Earlier I mentioned the dinghy motor was out of commission. We would have been able to at least make a few miles if we had been able to tie the dinghy alongside and use that to get us moving, but that wasn't an option. Remember from my previous blogs when I mentioned the way dolphins came and kept us company is close quarters? Well these weren't close quarters, but a pod of eight dolphins stayed beside us for those four hours. They only left when the wind piped up and we were able to sail. Amazing!

Harbourtown Marina has beautiful gardens.

Folly and Mariposa kept checking on us, but at one point they were too far away for us to hear them. They didn't realize that in those four hours we had only moved about two miles, so we were well out of range of their VHFs. They tried calling numerous times, other boats closer to us tried calling....we never heard them. On the AIS we weren't moving....no surprise there if you had been on our boat at that point! The US Coast Guard was contacted, they were given the whole story and Folly turned around. Eventually he was close enough for us to hear him and he did a broadcast on 16, relaying that we were fine. Hopefully the Coast Guard stood down. We never were contacted by them.

At The DockCrossing the Gulf Stream at night is unnerving enough never mind doing it alone with no engine. I contacted one ship to advise we were going  to cross their bow and we didn't have a motor to get out of their way. They altered course for us as did five other ships in the next couple of hours....they must have passed along the notice. Or they heard a woman's voice on the radio at 1am saying we had an issue! They did call me captain! We turned off the fridge, all unnecessary equipment and extra lights to conserve battery power for our navigation equipment and lights. Eventually the wind picked up and we headed for Fort Pierce. When daylight arrived the sun worked its magic on the solar panels to recharge the batteries.

TowAt daybreak the wind piped up and we had a terrific sail. We arrived near the inlet to Fort Pierce at 4:30 pm Sunday and TowBoat US was there to take us under tow. But as soon as he got the tow line in place, he got called to rescue capsized boat so we dropped the towline and kept sailing. Finally after an hour and another call to BoatUS, they sent a tow from Vero Beach for us. He towed us to Harbourtown Marina and nudged us into a slip. We had been underway for 37 hours and were exhausted. We still needed to check in with Customs but that is done online now. I am surprised I had enough energy left to go through that procedure!  A quick bite to eat in the restaurant at the marina and we went to bed.

Adamant 1 under tow...again!

Shallow WatersWe spent two days waiting for the mechanic. We have friends that live in Fort Pierce, so they came by, took us to lunch, then took us to get groceries.  Our appointment with the mechanic was for Wednesday, and after Pat told our story, he removed the water pump, along with the starter and solenoid. Apparently the impeller Pat had put in was the wrong one for this engine. The Yanmar ones fit in a different way, so the wrong one pushed its way out! And he showed us where the pump was corroding, so it would have self-destructed eventually.  Friday afternoon our parts arrived, but they didn't get installed until Tuesday afternoon. The service department at Harbourtown Marina is great to deal with, were very professional and the prices quoted were the prices on the invoice. The marina office gave us a break on dockage, so we only dropped a few thousand! [Remember the 35% exchange rate!] It could have been worse.

Calm enough to see our shadow below us!

Big ShipsWe left Fort Pierce on Wednesday morning and headed for Vero Beach, where our friends Jon and Marilyn live. They had taken us off the boat for a couple of days during our stay in Fort Pierce and we stayed at their house overnight....an escape from reality for a bit. It was only 12 miles to the new harbour and all was well in the engine room. We seem to have developed a small oil leak, only a few drops, but we can live with that until we get home. The weather is closing in for a couple of days, so we won't head out until Saturday. That's okay because we have a couple from BC rafted on our port side. They just arrived from Mexico via Cuba. On our starboard we have a boat from Sweden. So we have lots of stories between us!

The Nina and the Pinta on display in Vero Beach.

Until next time...….

Lynn- Longtime CY staffer Lynn Lortie and her husband Pat left Midland the summer of 2016 to make their way into the Great Loop and head out on a three year sailing odyssey. Follow their progress right here in CYOB.

Boat Reviews

  • Prev
The Oceanis Yacht 54, younger sister of the Oceanis 62, embodies the innovation that has always ...
Beneteau announces the launch of the latest addition to the Antares range! With a length overall of ...
New at the end of 2019, the 58 Salon Express design features large windows to flood the living ...
No wonder this is one of Regal’s best-selling boats; the Regal 33 Express offers amazing ...
The newest member of Beneteau’s Gran Turismo line is the GT 36 and this yacht brings the style and ...
With a philosophy of quality and 'doing things right Ranger Tugs launches the all new R-25 at the ...
The new Beneteau Swift Trawler 41 renews the spirit of the practical seaworthy cruiser. The ...
The Canadian Yachting test crew last week had the opportunity to run the Bavaria S36 HT at St ...

CY Virtual Video Boat Tours

Virtual Boat ToursWe all love boats and nothing can break us up! So, what better way to spend our time than looking at interesting boats and going aboard in a virtual ride or tour. We have asked our friends at various dealers and manufacturers to help us assemble a one-stop online resource to experience some of the most interesting boats on the market today. Where the CY Team has done a review, we connect you to that expert viewpoint. If you can’t go boating, you can almost experience the thrill via your screen. Not quite the same, but we hope you enjoy our fine tour collection.

 

Read more about the CY Virtual Boat Tours....................

AXOPAR 37 XC

 

Axopar 37 XCWhole new ball game…

 

Set aside your assumptions and expectations for a few minutes while we try to describe the new Axopar 37 XC that made its American debut at the 2020 Miami International Boat Show. This boat represents a whole new ball game in terms of design, performance, seakeeping and functionality. In fact, I’d say it takes a ‘clean sheet of paper’ approach to boating – it’s that different.

Read More about the Axopar 37 XC..................

Destinations

  • Prev
History: right after gym and just before chemistry class. Fifty minutes of naming the prime ...
On May 19, the New York State Canal Corporation today announced an updated opening schedule for the ...
If you have four hours to enjoy a fine tour of one of Canada’s most interesting waterways (let’s ...
Boom & Batten Restaurant is suspended over the water adjacent to the Songhees Walkway and ...
Provincial Boat Havens are those special places to drop anchor in British Columbia’s West Coast and ...
NW Explorations, a Bellingham, Washington-based yacht charter, brokerage, and marine services ...

Exiting Hogs BackBy John Morris

History: right after gym and just before chemistry class. Fifty minutes of naming the prime ministers by date and looking out the window. Who knew it was actually interesting.

And in some ways it hardly matters because the Rideau Waterway is just so amazingly beautiful. Driving your boat through the locks is wonderful fun for kids of all ages (adult kids, too) and the scenery is sensational. The history is a huge bonus however, and worth understanding from both as a political lesson and from an engineering perspective.

Read more about The Rideau...........


DIY & How to

  • Prev
One of the Great Lakes’ best known tall ships, sail training vessel TS Playfair, will soon be ...
My Dad is not a mechanical guy. He is educated and well-read, and handy around the house – but not ...
I was cleaning up my workbench the other day. My eyes then scanned across my workbench and fell on ...
July and August  in Canada are the months of boating. People are on the water – exploring, ...
Boating together with the kids as a family can be a most enjoyable activity. Because people, ...
I get a lot of calls for electrical repairs. Not upgrades or installations – the requests are to ...
Many boats are now on the water after a COVID-imposed hiatus – and with a shortened ‘prep’ period, ...
Wooden boat production in the 1940’s and 50’s was epitomized by expert craftsmanship, beautifully ...
Wrapping your hull with marine vinyl wrap instead using traditional marine paint seems like a new ...
Boating safety is always—always—a critical consideration whenever you push off the dock, but with ...

The BucketI was cleaning up my workbench the other day. My eyes then scanned across my workbench and fell on ‘the bucket’. Everyone has a one. On a boat, it’s usually in a cockpit lazarette. It’s full of old paint cans and half-used tubes of caulking. There might be some white grease, painters tape or epoxy in there, too. I take my bucket everywhere and it’s full of all sorts of tubes of grease and sealants and adhesives.

I thought to myself that I should probably sort through the bucket and get rid of the stuff that isn’t useful. I quickly realized, though, that each of the items in my bucket (except that had gone bad) were useful, and each is used for a particular job.

Read more about The Bucket..........

 

  

Marine Products

  • Prev
ShockAlarm is a floating, continuously monitoring alarm that protects your family and friends from ...
The Airhead Thrust is an out-of-this-world thrill ride.  Get your wetsuite out and get ready ...
Airhead Recreational Kayak is perfect for cruising boaters at anchor.  Stow it, inflate and ...
To help keep those aboard safe, critical equipment such as the compass must hold up in the rough ...
The Boating HD Marine & Lakes app from Navionics is an excellent resource to help plan your ...
Dive tanks are notoriously difficult to stow on a boat and can be outright dangerous if left ...
Waterways around the world are increasingly becoming choked with plastic trash. To stem the ...
QuenchSea is an up and coming low-cost, portable, manually-powered device that instantly turns ...
The Big Orange Original Filter is connected to the vent line leaving your boats holding tank.  ...
The Cablemaster Model CM-7 is a solid when it comes to handling and storing bulky 50 amp power ...