Oct 8, 2020

Coalition Group(From left to right) Boating Ontario CEO Rick Layzell; Pollution Probe CEO Christopher Hilkene; NOVA Chemicals VP Rob Thompson; and Council of the Great Lakes Region  President and CEO Mark Fisher

The Council of the Great Lakes Region (CGLR), thanks to funding from Environment and Climate Change Canada, recently announced the launch of the first phase of the Great Lakes Plastic Cleanup initiative with founding partners Pollution Probe, the University of Toronto (U of T) Trash Team, Boating Ontario, PortsToronto, as well as collaborators EnviroPod, Water Products and Solutions-America, Poralu Marine and Georgian Bay Forever.

Plastic debris accounts for around 80% of the litter found on Great Lakes shorelines. In fact, it is estimated that a staggering 10 million kilograms of plastic enters the largest freshwater system in the world each year from Canada and the United States. It could cost more than $400 million annually to curtail plastic pollution through beach and waterway cleanups, public anti-littering campaigns, and the development and deployment of innovative capture and cleanup technologies.

Through the Great Lakes Plastic Cleanup initiative, CGLR, working alongside its project partners, will spearhead and support the largest single deployment of two innovative technologies in the world, the Seabin and the LittaTrap, to capture and recover plastic debris along Ontario’s Great Lakes shorelines.

In total, 16 Seabin devices will be installed through this of phase of the initiative, which will help researchers study plastic pollution in our waterways as well as reinforce the importance of “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle,” the iconic phrase coined by Pollution Probe in the early 1970s that today has global reach and a new significance as we shift to a circular future. In addition to the installation of Seabin devices, 10 LittaTrap™ devices will be deployed at a select number of marinas to capture and prevent the flow of plastic and other debris from entering the lakes. 

Participating marinas, confirmed thanks to a close collaboration with Boating Ontario, the province’s leading voice for the recreational boating industry, include:

SeabinNew Sites

• Huck’s Marine & Resort, Rockport
• Port Whitby Marina, Whitby
• Trent Port Marina, Trenton
• Toronto Island Marina, Toronto
• Bay Port Yachting Centre, Midland
• Wye Heritage Marina, Midland
• Kon Tiki Marine, Gilford
• Queen’s Cove Marina, Victoria Harbour
• Thornbury Harbour, Thornbury
• Spanish Municipal Marina, Spanish
• Prince Arthur’s Landing, Thunder Bay

During a recent PortsToronto pilot in Toronto’s Outer Harbour Marina, a partnership with student researchers from the U of T Trash Team found that two Seabins collected up to two kilograms of litter per day, and captured a wide array of plastic, including microplastics. The LittaTrap™ is no less impressive, with a design that allows it to capture and retain 100% of plastic and other debris larger than 5mm carried in stormwater. 

The U of T Trash Team will again lead the analysis as part of the Great Lakes Plastic Cleanup, auditing the captured litter to produce valuable information on the sources and accumulation of plastic pollution in local freshwater ecosystems. Data collected will be used to help identify, for government, industry and civil society, what can be done to prevent plastic from reaching the lakes in the future.

Quotes:

“Plastic litter in the Great Lakes is a significant problem, arising in part from poor recycling. As we seek to end plastic waste by closing the loop in our economy and adopting circular solutions, this innovative project begins the task of capturing and cleaning up plastic pollution before and after it enters our lakes and rivers,” said Mark Fisher, President and CEO, Council of the Great Lakes Region.

“Boating Ontario members live and breathe the health of our waterways on behalf of all boaters. The Great Lakes Plastic Cleanup is a wonderful initiative that ties in perfectly to our 24 ++ year run with our industry Clean Marine environmental program. We all look forward to the collection results as we strive to be your stewards of the water,” said Rick Layzell, CEO, Boating Ontario Association

Related Articles

Monday, 16 November 2020 22:04

CTV News crews were in Midland, Ontario to document the operation of Seabins at some of the Maple Leaf Marinas locations in Georgian Bay.

Wednesday, 09 September 2020 02:45

New Great Lakes Plastic Cleanup Initiative aims to tackle the problem head-on through the largest deployment of Seabin and LittaTrap™ technology in the world.

 

 

Beneteau Oceanis Yacht 54By Zuzana Prochazka

Beneteau saw an opportunity to add a little thrill to any cruising adventure, so they took the hull of the First 53 racer (introduced just last year), and with a few fashionable changes, created the Oceanis Yacht 54, the new entry-level of Beneteau’s swanky Oceanis Yacht line. The result is a performance cruiser that sails like a witch and looks like a grande dame.

Design

Roberto Biscontini is the naval architect and Lorenzo Argento created the details of the exterior and interior design. 

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Riverest MarinaThe new owners of L’Orignal Marina offer boaters a new destination. Located in a charming francophone village in Eastern Ontario, this joined marina and restaurant venue is the ambitious initiative of long-time entrepreneur André Chabot and biologist Alexandra Quester, both residents of L’Orignal.

The purchase of the L’Orignal Marina was made official in November 2020. The new year was barely underway when all 50 available slips were already reserved. No wonder the addition of member and visitor slips is already planned for the 2022 season – the 2021 count is up to 62 power and sail already. At the moment, the Riverest Marina offers boaters a stop where they can launch their boat...

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Galvanic CorrosionIt’s a scary thought – but whether your boat is made of wood, fiberglass, aluminum or composite – it’s slowly deteriorating under you. Part of this is the nature of the marine environment: Sun, moisture, waves, wind, movement and vibration all contribute to components breaking down.

But there are other factors that are much more concerning and act at a significantly faster rate that the environment can take credit for. One of these is commonly spoken of, but not terribly well understood: Corrosion. As boaters, we’re concerned with two main types of corrosion: Galvanic and Stray-Current. This edition will focus on galvanic corrosion – in two weeks, stay tuned for info on stray-current.

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Mia and Caleb's EngagementOn July 23 last year, CYOB published a piece on a beautifully restored 1967 Trojan 42 Motor Yacht in Oromocto NB. (That piece was also expanded in CY magazine later in the year.)

One of our Canadian Yachting contributors, Denise Miller, had shared the article on my social media and a young man reached out and asked if she could connect him with the owners of the boat, Dave and Barb. Denise leapt into action and Dave and Barb were thrilled. They concocted a plan that the young lady, Mia, thought she was coming to model for a sales brochure for Dave to do charter tours.

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