Sept 28, 2017

New Regatta CrewClarity Stone attended a couple of events in Youngstown this summer and reflects on how they have changed.

I guess it’s true what they say. The only thing that stays the same is change. Regattas are not what they used to be. Gone are they days of 20 boat rafts, tents filing the yacht club grounds and beer trucks lining the streets to serve hundreds of sailors. People just seem otherwise occupied now. There is always a festival going on, a wedding to attend or another commitment. It seems we are always struggling for crew and registration numbers are slipping. As our generation of sailors ages and the millennial age becomes busier and busier, we need to remember why we all attended regattas in the first place; the competition, the fun and the camaraderie.

Derek Vandemeer and Chris JohnstonThis year I attended again what was formerly known as the Youngstown Levels, a legendary weekend where we all got away from real life, went sailing, and partied the night away. The July event was a shadow of its former self. Boats were rafted two out and not a beer line in sight. But somehow, we had a weekend to remember. We didn’t try to hold on to what we thought a regatta should be and instead created a whole new style of regatta for ourselves.
First of all, we no longer stay in tents. Our slightly above average crew age members no longer fell the need to slum it camping and the younger half have developed a taste for the high life so now we rent rooms at the top of the hill. We have showers and air conditioning. Regatta life refined.

Beneteau 36 RegattaOne of our crew members has a Jeanneau 45.7 called Dolce Vita and he sailed it across to act as “tender” for the weekend. The boat has been completely redone with down duvets and an ice machine.

Following racing, we all showered and got dressed up before heading to what we dubbed “Bistro Dolce”. Our host had two barbecues going, one on the back and one on the front (bow-bq) serving up delicious jerk chicken, roasted potatoes. The bistro then converted into “Club Dolce” and the tunes were rocking all night with disco ball included. We only came in from our mooring when we ran out of wine.

This regatta was so much fun that we thought that we would try it again. September 17-18 Youngstown hosted the Beneteau First 36.7 North American Championships. So off we headed with our 45-foot tender and an excellent team lined up. This time we rented an entire apartment; we stocked the kitchen and were ready to pack lunches for three days of racing 11 boats registered.

The best part of our regatta was the amazing team of sailors that our skipper had assembled. We figured that among us we had over 100 years of sailing experience and everyone had a high capacity sense of humour, essential for three days stuck on a boat together.

Briar Robertson and Jeff

The wind-up night of the regatta was a formal dinner hosted in the dining room of YYC. We put on our sailing best to gorge on steak and red wine before declaring ourselves the winner of the best looking crew award. No regatta is complete without a dance party so our crew (mostly the ladies) went over to check out the band and to get a few of our fellow competitors out on the floor.

Al StokesRichard Reid and his crew on Zingara captured victory at the Beneteau 36.7 North Americans. Although we don’t get out as many boats as we used to, those of us still attending regattas know why we still go. We spent a weekend racing with friends - friends who we can count on for a good laugh who we can trust out on the water to have our backs when the winds come up.

Racing has changed here on Lake Ontario so let’s find ways to keep enjoying what we do best and keep racing. Whether it’s taking shuffleboard lessons from locals at the Stone Jug or starting dance parties like it’s your day job. Remember that it’s the team that you race with and the fun that you have that keep you going backs. Cheers to the Modern Regatta!

Cobourg Yacht Club - 2015 Sailing instructorsKatherine Stone

Like many other harbours on Lake Ontario, Cobourg has seen its fair share of changes. Screams used to be heard from kids piled into a toboggan on wheels that went hurtling down a wooden slide into the harbour. Above it all was the bustling din from the waterfront of ship’s whistles, train engines, foghorns and thundering coal cars. It is now a rather serene place for the locals and visitors to enjoy various watercraft. Fortunately, the beautiful beach that lines the waterfront is still a star attraction for the town.

Located 95 kilometres east of Toronto and 62 kilometres east of Oshawa on the north edge of Lake Ontario, United Empire Loyalists first starting arriving in the area as early as the 1780s. The first settlement in 1798 was called Buckville, later renamed Amherst, then called Hamilton (after the township) and also nicknamed Hardscrabble. It wasn’t until 1819 that they finally settled on the name of Cobourg, which was incorporated as a town in 1837. In the late 1820s large schooners with passengers and cargo had to anchor well off shore, as there was only a landing wharf. A group of Toronto businessmen formed the Cobourg Harbour Company which built the wooden Eastern Pier from tolls charged for the use of the harbour.

Read more: Cobourg Yacht Club...

Andrew AlbertiIn the past two issues we have been doing an overview of the right-of-way rules. In the first, we did a review of Section A of Part 2, in the second we did a review of the definitions. This issue, we will look at Section B of Part 2, General Limitations, which is essentially limitations applying to boats that have right of way according to Section A.

GENERAL LIMITATIONS

14 AVOIDING CONTACT

A boat shall avoid contact with another boat if reasonably possible. However, a right-of-way boat or one entitled to room or mark-room

Read more about the right-of-way rules.......................

 

  

CY Virtual Video Boat Tours

Virtual Boat ToursWe all love boats and nothing can break us up! So, what better way to spend our time than looking at interesting boats and going aboard in a virtual ride or tour. We have asked our friends at various dealers and manufacturers to help us assemble a one-stop online resource to experience some of the most interesting boats on the market today. Where the CY Team has done a review, we connect you to that expert viewpoint. Our Virtual Show will continue to grow so visit frequently and check it out. If you can’t go boating, you can almost experience the thrill via your screen. Not quite the same, but we hope you enjoy our fine tour collection.

 

Read more about the CY Virtual Boat Tours....................

 

Beneteau Oceanis 30.1As boat builders clamber to create ever-bigger platforms for ever-more generous budgets, the entry-level cruiser has become an elusive animal. Sure, if you want to daysail, there are plenty of small open boats from which to choose, but if you want a freshly built pocket cruiser, you’re in for a long search. Enter French builder Groupe Beneteau, which identified this gap in the market and set about creating the Oceanis 30.1, an adorable little cruiser that resembles her larger siblings in all but length and price. With all she offers, it wouldn’t be a stretch to call her a mini yacht.

Read More about the Beneteau Oceanis 30.1..................

KingstonBy Amy Hogue

Cruise into the city of Kingston, Ontario, and it will quickly become clear that this city and surrounding waterways have something special. Built around the northern shore of Lake Ontario, Kingston is the place to go if you love to explore new waterways, fantastic views, and exceptional boating opportunities.

Sitting at the intersection of three world-class Canadian bodies of water, Lake Ontario, the St. Lawrence River, and the UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Rideau Canal (Cataraqui River from Kingston to Newboro), the water’s influence is deeply woven into Kingston’s culture and history. 

Read more about Kingston...........