Mar 24, 2022

2022 Spring Commissioning ChecklistEveryone has their own spring ritual that often includes rooting through the basement or garage and finding the uncompleted tasks from last year.

With the help of some pros and useful advice from Sail Canada and BoatUS, CYOB has prepared a lengthy, but not necessarily complete, checklist to help you get the most out of the upcoming season.

 

Before You Launch

1. Inspect all around the hose clamps for rust and replace as necessary. Double clamp fuel lines and exhaust hoses with marine-rated stainless steel hose clamps. It’s wise to double clamp whenever possible on all hoses — especially those below the waterline.

2. Inspect all hoses for stiffness, rot, leaks and cracking, and replace any that are faulty. Make sure they fit snugly.

3. Inspect prop(s) for dings, pitting and distortion. Make sure cotter pins are secure.

4. Grip the prop (on inboard drive systems) and try moving the shaft up and down and side to side. If it’s loose and can be wiggled, the cutless bearing may need to be replaced.

5. Check the rudderstock to ensure it hasn’t been bent. Operate the wheel or tiller to ensure the steering works correctly. Check the rudder bearing and steering cable for unusual play or movement.

6. Inspect the hull for blisters, distortions and stress cracks.

7. Make sure your engine intake sea strainer is not cracked or bent from ice and is free of corrosion, clean and properly secured.

8. With inboards, check the engine shaft and rudder stuffing boxes for correct adjustment. A stuffing box should leak no more than two or three drops each minute when the prop shaft is turning.

9. Inspect, lubricate and exercise thru-hull valves. It’s a prudent idea to tie a right-sized wooden bung to the valve in case of failure.

10. Use a garden hose to check for deck leaks at ports and hatches. Renew caulk or gaskets as necessary.

11. Inspect and test the bilge pump and float switch to ensure they’re both working properly. Also inspect the pump’s hose.

12. Check stove and remote LPG tanks for loose fittings, leaking hoses and properly functioning shutoff systems. Use the pressure gauge to conduct a leak down test to check for system leaks.

13. Inspect dock and anchor lines for chafe and wear.

14. If equipped, ensure that the stern drain plug is installed.

15. After the boat is launched, be sure to check all thru-hulls for leaks.

 

Sailboat Rigging

1. Inspect swage fittings for cracks and heavy rust (some discoloration is acceptable). Inspect wire halyards and running backstays for “fishhooks” and rust. Check rope to wire splices.

2. Remove tape on turnbuckles and lubricate threads, preferably with Teflon. Replace old tape with fresh tape and ensure that water can freely drain from it.

3. If you suspect the core around a chainplate is damp, remove the chainplate to inspect and make repairs.

4. Inspect masthead sheaves and all blocks to make sure they’re running freely.

5. Check rigging for ware and rod rigging for kinks.

 

Paperwork

1. Review your boat insurance policy and update coverage if needed.

2. PCOC – ensure that everyone who operates the boat or might has the Pleasure Craft Operator Card and appropriate Harbour Licence.

3. A station licence is not required for Canadian boaters in Canadian waters, but you will need a VHF Station Licence if you plan to voyage in US waters.

4. ROC stands for Restricted Radiotelephone Operator’s Certificate and is required by anyone using a marine VHF radio or other marine radios (each person on the boat who will use the radio needs their own card). There are significant fines if you are found using a VHF or marine radio without your card.

In addition, if you received your ROC card before the new Digital Selective Calling was introduced, then you are encouraged to return and get your DSC endorsement for your ROC card.

All new VHF radios are now sold with a DSC function that will greatly enhance rescue personnel’s ability to assist you in an emergency. Understanding this technology and how to operate it can, in some circumstances, mean the difference between life and death.

 

In the April 7 issue, the Checklist continues: Engines and Fuel Systems, Outdrives and Outboards, Trailers, and Safety 

 

Related Articles

Tuesday, 12 May 2020 20:39

These days, the internet is full of memes with the message of ‘we’re all in this together’. As a marine mechanic, I’ve been partial to the phrases that reference boating. My favourite so far has...

Tuesday, 20 April 2021 22:57

SPRINGFIELD, Va., April 12, 2021 -- Recent moves by the New York State Canal System’s parent New York Power Authority (NYPA) to drastically reduce the 524-mile waterway’s annual six-month operating...

Tuesday, 09 March 2021 16:07

An act that was recently introduced in the waning days of New York’s annual budget process that allows no opportunity for public input proposes significant management changes to the New York...

Wednesday, 02 December 2020 00:39

Customize your own nautically themed greetings and help support boating safety, clean water efforts for recreational boaters. This year, people are sending more holiday cards than ever. So...

Tuesday, 21 July 2020 15:39

In a release on June 25, 2020, BoatUS, America’s largest advocacy, services and safety group for recreational boaters, stated that an April 22 decision by the Federal Communications...

Monday, 21 March 2016 22:27

Allowing a select few to carve out their own special anchoring restrictions, and bypassing a pilot program designed to provide practical, uniform anchoring regulations statewide is a mistake, says...

Boat Reviews

Video Gallery

 

 

Oakley 245 CCBy Andy Adams

The multi-generational island cottagers of Georgian Bay and serious fishermen are just two of the groups most attracted to the new Oakley Boats models.

Brad Oakley has been around the boat business his entire life and he said to me that he has long admired durable, seaworthy welded aluminum boats. His company WMW Vacuum Pumpout Systems in Waubaushene, Ontario on Georgian Bay, builds highly regarded vacuum pump-out systems and Oakley’s equipment is in so many marinas that he knows a lot of people in the business.

Read More

 

 

 

Fountaine Pajot Astrea 42By Katherine Stone

On a beautiful summer morning in July, I hopped aboard a new-owner delivery from the Outer Harbour Marina in Toronto to the Port Credit Harbour Marina in Mississauga, with the President of Navy Point Yacht Sales, Steve McPherson. I don’t know if I have ever referred to a boat as pretty, but this adjective fits the Fountaine Pajot Astrea 42 to a tee.

The transitions and communication from interior to exterior spaces are seamless and well-thought-out with functional ergonomics. 

Read More

Destinations

  • Prev
Following the War of 1812, a battle that Canada narrowly won against the United States, the ...
You’ve weathered COVID and you’re ready to book your charter to paradise. You’ve done some ...
If you are looking for an interesting destination for a weekend trip or longer, Quebec City will ...
A holiday often is defined by the experiences we make in unique and beautiful settings. But what ...
St Vincent and the Grenadines is open to tourists and Horizon Yacht Charters are looking forward to ...
We bobbed in the brisk winds while rounding the breakwater into Victoria Harbour, then lowered sail ...
Over the course of four days in September 1864, representatives from Prince Edward Island, Nova ...
The new owners of L’Orignal Marina offer boaters a new destination. Located in a charming ...
Commemorating 100 (+1) years of through-navigation on the Trent-Severn Waterway National Historic ...
On Friday, April 2 at 7 pm ET on TVO and streaming anytime after that on tvo.org and the TVO ...

The Ottawa Flight LocksFollowing the War of 1812, a battle that Canada narrowly won against the United States, the boundaries of Upper Canada were held and the British army realized that the St. Lawrence River was no longer safe as a supply route. A more defensible route was needed to bring supplies from Montreal to Kingston and on into other Great Lakes settlements.

This new, more secure route revealed itself through the travel and trade of the Indigenous peoples. Surveyors learned that one of the Indigenous trade routes began at the mouth of the Cataraqui River in Kingston (Canada’s first national capital) and connected a series of lakes and rivers all the way through to where the Rideau River meets the Ottawa River in the heart of Bytown (known today as Canada’s national capital: the City of Ottawa). 

Read More

Lifestyle

  • Prev
There are two POTWs this time. The reason? Guilt. We are picking up the first one from the internet ...
So, I’m at Mobility Cup in Nepean, across the river from Ottawa. I’ve participated in Mobility Cup ...
Emirates Team New Zealand, who introduced foiling to America’s Cup competition in 2012, is ...
Our own Ask Andrew ‘floated his Fanny down the Ganny’ in the annual boat race held on Ganaraska ...
While there’s all kinds of discussion, particularly in NZ, about the plan to defend the 37th ...
How a young woman who was encouraged by her father to enter a contest, became a member of the ...
We got this beauty from Don Snell of the Sea Spray Class in Alberta who proudly reminds us “the ...
This past June I stepped aside as Publisher of Canadian Yachting Media after a ten-year run. It was ...
This February, Sarah Douglas, Canadian Olympic Team member in the Laser Radial class, won the Laser ...
We have had Christmas tree photos in years past, but this topper says it all. Like the traditional ...

Marine Products

  • Prev
The club's first digital guide is the collaborative effort of dozens of CCA members and now ...
The days are lovely and what better way to celebrate than heading to the engine compartment. Here ...
While collapsible bimini tops offer boaters a welcome escape from direct sun, deployment and ...
Volvo Penta is launching its Assisted Docking system as a retrofit upgrade for many yacht owners ...
Don’t let offshore emergencies turn into disasters. SeaKits help to prepare you for emergencies at ...
It’s one of the best things about sailors: we hate to give up on our equipment. But if you’re like ...
Furuno has announced that Navionics cartography is now available on their GP1871F and GP1971F ...
With the boat back in the water it’s time to refresh our boating skills after a long lay-off. ...
I’ve been doing powerboat reviews for Canadian Yachting magazine for over 40 years now and I want ...
Many boaters prefer the clean appearance and greater safety of modern pull-up cleats that retract ...

News

  • Prev
According to their Facebook page, TSN is on onboard as The Canadian SailGP’s entry’s broadcast ...
According to International Boating Industry magazine, the BRIG factory near Kharkiv, Ukraine ...
After a two-year hiatus the 53rd edition of Antigua Sailing Week wrapped up on Sunday, brimming ...
When SailGP Season 3 commences on May 14 in Bermuda, it will mark an historic moment for Canadian ...
Georgian Bay boaters are familiar with the prehistoric landscape of the Bruce peninsula and are ...
Canada SailGP Team has unveiled a three-year partnership with the Algorand Foundation. The ...
Note: this information applies to Lake Ontario but indicates what is expected by US authorities ...
At the 2022 Palm International Beach Boat Show, BoatTEST founder Jeff Hammond met with Boyd ...
Winds, waves, fog, lightning, hail, tornadoes .... hurricanes! The wise boater respects and ...
The Maritime Radio course teaches emergency radio procedures and everyday operating techniques. ...

Fuel EconomyI filled up last week at $1.90. Pundits are suggesting that prices will stay high throughout the summer. Radio and TV news have been flooded with ‘man on the street’ interviews that show the impact on the average driver. How will these prices affect the average boater this year? Will we see more hours spent on the docks and fewer on the water? Will fuel efficiency become a top-of –mind selling point? Will we see a shift toward electric marine engines?

Time will tell – but for the majority of us, we’ll need to weather the storm as best we can. There are a number of tips and tricks we can employ aboard to make the most of our boat’s fuel. BoatUS published an excellent article this week that I’ll break down...

Read More