Story and Photos By John Morris

When boaters ventured into Frenchman’s Bay even a couple of decades ago, it was not without some trepidation - the entrance to the harbour was badly marked and was flanked by the remnants of underwater pier footings, the water inside the bay was so shallow running aground was a certainty for any but the shallowest drawing and the docks were slightly wobbly and mosquito populated.   But all that has changed and more transformations are underway even as you read this.

In recent years Frenchman’s Bay has seen a complete makeover of its east shore, a refurbishing of the beachfront and particularly a radical reno of the immediate blocks of Liverpool Road that lead down to the marinas. Much of the bay has been dredged and currently the channel into the bay is getting a multi-million modernization.

Frenchman’s Bay occupies a unique place in this country as one of the very few privately owned harbours dating back to the commerce of 19th century when on April 28, 1877 an Act of Parliament gave the Pickering Harbour Company a federal charter for the waters. Over the intervening century, the bay evolved into a shallow but serviceable recreational boating area. The small but welcoming Frenchman’s Bay Yacht Cub has a long history. According to the club’s account it was formed in 1938 when “The Bay was predominately a summer community, with Avis Dance pavilion, now Swan's Marine Supply Store, the centre of social activity. The Annual Regatta on the August Holiday weekend was a highlight of the summer activities.”

While FBYC on the west shore of the Bay looks more or less the same as always, the rest of the area has changed significantly. The Pickering Harbour Company rather than the government controlled the navigational aspects of Frenchman’s Bay as well as almost all of its shores and bottom and the relationship with the various governments is not always harmonious. as a result upgrades were perennially slow to arrive. Only comparatively recently were substantial lights installed on the rocky piers that extend out into Lake Ontario from the entrance gap in the sandbar that encloses the bay. Until recently the area was locked in time somewhere in between a boaters’ paradise and a rural marshland even as modern Pickering was growing to the north.

Bernie Luttmer, the owner of Swan’s Marina first discovered the Bay in 1973 when he decided that if he was going to live in Toronto, he wanted to have a sailboat. Looking for a place to moor it he unearthed a cottage at the foot of Liverpool Road that had a slip. He bought the cottage from Herman Swan and lived there, then quit his job and evolved the place into Swan’s Marina, just as the fiberglass boat was revolutionizing sailing. Today Luttmer is a key player in the redevelopment but back then he describes it as a no man’s land. “There was no sewage or water - we had to bring jugs from the gas station up Liverpool road in order to make tea.”

Bay Ridges, the portion of Pickering south of Highway 401, was a haphazard collection of old style cottages, 60s homes and a sprinkling of high-rise condo towers. But things changed in 2002 when the Pickering Harbour Company got permission to develop in the area of Liverpool Road abutting Frenchman’s Bay and with two developers created mixed-use nautical village.  The city, recognizing that they had a diamond in the (very) rough, published Development Guidelines for what had once been called Fairport Village encouraging its rebirth for “marinas, yacht clubs, mooring facilities, and ancillary facilities; marina-supportive uses and facilities; restaurants, limited retail; public open space; and community, cultural and recreational uses.”

Ten years later, voila! The marinas on the east side of the bay are spruced up and adjacent to them there is a Nautical Village of 130 or so homes, condos and shops with interspersed park areas and even a small swimming pool for residents. A New Urbanism main street is clearly modern but conveys a small town feels without being twee. Ground floor shops and cafés with condos above blend attractively with the surroundings.  On narrow streets between Liverpool and the waterfront, there’s a cluster of homes overlooking the Bay. There’s a fine gazebo and the planted trees are achieving some size. 

At the south end of the Village, Liverpool Road turns into Millennium Square across from Swan’s. This public space is used for events while providing a gateway to the well-enjoyed beaches that access Lake Ontario. Purists may scream ‘kitsch,’ but mostly the area has acknowledged its 150 years of waterfront history while creating an area that is increasingly used by both locals and visiting boaters.

For a visiting boat, there are several choices for dockage and lots to do. The three marinas on the east shore, Swan’s, Frenchman’s Bay Marina and Wharf Street all offer transient docking. Reciprocal club members can visit FBYC then circumnavigate the Bay via Bayly Street to get to bustle of the east shore.

Especially on the west arm of the sandbar, the natural setting remains intact.  Exploring along Beachpoint Promenade, the road that runs along the narrow land strip, you’re miles from civilization. Water yoga types from yogata.ca doing their stretches on paddleboards and there’s the rustic but very active Rouge Canoe club, currently still rebuilding from a 1995 fire that all but wiped it out. The bay and its marsh environment remain tranquil and rural. Looking south across the sandbar is the beach and Lake Ontario vista .

One distinctive feature of the Pickering shore, for better or worse, is the Nuke Plant with hulking silos and a towering wind turbine . On the east side of the bay the kids and parents enjoying fishing in Hydro Marsh and playing enthusiastically on the excellent splash pad blissfully unconcerned about the enormous plant a few hundred metres down the beach.

Frenchman’s Bay is the first stop heading east just barely beyond the borders of the Toronto GTA, an easy hop from the clubs and marina at Bluffers Park.  Once cruisers seeking onshore dining could choose the chip truck or a hike up to the perennial boater favorite Massey’s on Liverpool Road but today new food options include Hy-Tea, an authentic teahouse, Café Crème Brulee with crepes and cupcakes galore or an old fashioned style ice cream stand.

More substantial shore restaurants overlook the docks: The Waterfront, just east of Swan’s Marina, serves upscale pub food on its two fine balconies as well as inside. Port, onshore next to Frenchman’s Bay Marina just steps north, is a fine dining spot where Executive Chef & ISG Certified Sommelier Thomas Heitz creates menus to reflect the season and local ingredients.  There’s also The Lake House, an attractive banquet/business facilities that hosts a lot of weddings overlooking our romantic boats.  

In addition to the changes on shore, the three levels of government are spending $9 million to upgrade the entrance to the Bay. Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)’s website has extensive information on the project that “will result in the creation of a safe harbour entrance while preserving and enhancing the ecological conditions.” The report from last June indicates the size of the undertaking “Approximately 7,900 tonnes of gabion stone and 2,500 tonnes of rip rap were transported to the east spit with the use of a tug boat and two barges. In addition, over 4,000 tonnes of rip rap was delivered for use on the west breakwater.” Fans of the Bay can subscribe to the TRCA’s free online newsletter. The project is scheduled for completion in December 2014.

With all the onshore and waterfront projects, Frenchman’s Bay is emerging as a top tier boating destination, completely sheltered from the Lake and adding cruising features enthusiastically. For years Frenchman’s Bay languished as a bit of a secret swampy paradise, but that secret is definitely making its way onto the front page. If the esthetic distance between marshland and waterfront fine dining can be properly bridged, the Bay might develop into one of the finest boater destinations anywhere.

Photo Captions:

Photo 1: Fishing in Hydro Pond
Photo 2: This aerial shot gives a unique perspective of the club’s protected location and comprehensive facilities.   Credit: Kalloon Photography
Photo 3: Main street scale makes the Village work
Photo 4: Launch ramp adjacent to Swan's on the east side
Photo 5: The Lake House event centre is right on the bay

Related Articles

Friday, 08 March 2013 13:33

Completing the Tour of the Six Celtic Nations. Sheryl and Paul Shard continue their sailing adventures with an autumn cruise of the Brittany coast of France aboard their Southerly 49 sailboat,...

Monday, 11 March 2013 15:06

It’s really astonishing. In Ontario’s Golden Horseshoe, there are six million or so of us, crowded into bustling neighbourhoods and driving on packed roads. As Canadians we see the...

Wednesday, 05 June 2013 14:48

Each summer, in a Canadian cruising tradition, thousands of Western Lake Ontario sailors join the annual summer migration to the Bay of Quinte and the Thousand Islands.  The route,  for most of us,...

Friday, 10 May 2013 16:07

Let’s be honest. In terms of Canadian small cities Belleville is just another one. However, as a boating destination and as a historically important sailing force, it punches well above its weight....

Monday, 08 July 2013 10:31

Canadian Yachting spoke to Al Donaldson, executive director of Boating Ontario who confirmed that notification has been sent to the Boater Assist Canada members stating that the Board of Directors...

Tuesday, 04 June 2013 15:21

Call now - there may still be time to get involved! ‘Make a big SPLASH this summer’ is the slogan being used for the 3rd annual Splash Floating Water Festival being held on Saturday...

Boat Reviews

  • Prev
Once again, Cruisers Yachts is leading the market for day boats with their new 42 GLS model that ...
Optimized sailing performance and comfortable living – a sweet ride. The expression that came to ...
This is such an exciting time in boating! While we feel very sorry for people whose health and ...
For many, the 2020 sailing year will be one to go down into the books as “different”. With delayed ...
What perfect timing! Beneteau is has just announced their new Antares 11 model for North America ...
Commodore’s Boats is a full-service shipyard with over 50 years of generational history and ...
The Oceanis Yacht 54, younger sister of the Oceanis 62, embodies the innovation that has always ...
Beneteau announces the launch of the latest addition to the Antares range! With a length overall of ...
I had been looking forward to a sea trial aboard the Greenline 33 because I was hoping it would ...
New at the end of 2019, the 58 Salon Express design features large windows to flood the living ...

CY Virtual Video Boat Tours

Virtual Boat ToursWe all love boats and nothing can break us up! So, what better way to spend our time than looking at interesting boats and going aboard in a virtual ride or tour. We have asked our friends at various dealers and manufacturers to help us assemble a one-stop online resource to experience some of the most interesting boats on the market today. Where the CY Team has done a review, we connect you to that expert viewpoint. If you can’t go boating, you can almost experience the thrill via your screen. Not quite the same, but we hope you enjoy our fine tour collection.

 

Read more about the CY Virtual Boat Tours....................

 

Cruisers Yachts 42 GLSBy Andy Adams

Once again, Cruisers Yachts is leading the market for day boats with their new 42 GLS model that premiered at the Fort Lauderdale Boat Show at the end of October. The concept of a large day boat is now a very well-established trend made possible by the amazing new power and efficiency of the latest four stroke outboards.

Buyers are looking for a different boating experience and we think that the 42 GLS nails it. Fast, handsome and versatile, the 42 GLS is designed for fun and adventure.

Read More

 

Bahamas - There and Back Again IIIn Part I, Sheryl Shard ended the story at June and the start of Hurricane Season when they were once again joined by friends.

This time it was Noel and Tracey Dinan, whose new shallow-draft Allures 49.5 was in build at the time, we headed north from the Exumas across the expanse of the Great Bahama Bank, dodging coral patches as we sailed to Eleuthera then Marsh Harbour, Great Abaco. Another commercial centre in the islands, we cleared out of the Bahamas here after provisioning for our offshore passage up to the Chesapeake Bay on the US mainland and out of the Hurricane Zone until mid-November...

Read More

Lifestyle

  • Prev
OK, stop the presses. This photo just came in from Beacon Bay. Clearly those folks know how to get ...
Back in the day, the publisher of a magazine would receive a bound copy of the year’s monthly ...
Boaters on BC’s West Coast have heard the story of the garbage pickers of the Marine debris removal ...
Skipper John “Drew” Plominski is hoping that lightning doesn’t strike twice. Plominski, whose boat ...
The Association provides a forum for exchanging information, tips and access an advocate on behalf ...
Kristin Cummings, Operations Manager at Beacon Bay Marina took this shot after the skies broke ...
Our Photo of the Week (two, in fact) comes from New Zealand where the second America’s Cup AC 75 ...
The Marine Debris Recovery Initiative (MDRI), a collaboration with the Clean Coast, Clean Waters ...
The International Joint Commission (IJC) is reviewing Plan 2014 and could use your help. The plan ...
The Council of the Great Lakes Region (CGLR), thanks to funding from Environment and Climate Change ...

DIY & How to

  • Prev
Styles, shapes, pitch and diameter of props are widely discussed on online boating forums, YouTube ...
There’s nothing worse than wondering how much fuel you have on board. You’re left wondering how ...
As the cold approaches, shrink-wrapping is a hot topic, and I’ve heard more than a few debates at ...
“They don’t make ‘em like they used to”, is a phrase that many of us are familiar with. Most of the ...
I’m on many different types of boats, with many configurations. Some have a single ...
I often get asked if regular care and maintenance is necessary for inflatable PFDs. Here is a ...
Labour Day weekend tends to be the ‘last hurrah’ on many fronts: the last long weekend of the ...
One of the Great Lakes’ best known tall ships, sail training vessel TS Playfair, will soon be ...
My Dad is not a mechanical guy. He is educated and well-read, and handy around the house – but not ...
I was cleaning up my workbench the other day. My eyes then scanned across my workbench and fell on ...

WinterizationBy Andrew McDonald, Lakeside Marine Services

“They don’t make ‘em like they used to”, is a phrase that many of us are familiar with. Most of the time it is in reference to a bygone era of better, and it’s used to lament the sorry state of what we have today. It is a phrase that can be applied to many areas of our lives: architecture, art, furniture, tools. Boats? I would argue that they don’t make them like they used to. But, is that lamentable, or is it progress?

Progress, I think. With this concept in mind, as we enter another season of putting boats to bed for the winter, why do we winterize as we always have?

Read More

 

  

Marine Products

  • Prev
On Monday, Volvo Penta announced the availability of their fully integrated assisted docking system ...
Perhaps the ultimate audio solution for boat owners, the JBL by Harman BassPro Go from Prospec ...
It only takes one foggy, disorienting day on the water to make a boat owner understand the value of ...
It’s a voyage everyone wants to undertake, but few get to make. The Whales of Lake Erie is the ...
Over the years I have had a real soft spot for the Jeep Wrangler line of models. Recently I had the ...
Wait no longer, the 2021 Rideau Canal & Lower Ottawa River PORTS Guide has returned! Purchase ...
The Tundra 65 is Yeti's most versatile cooler, just as adept at keeping catches cold as it is ...
Fireball self Extinguisher. It's a revolutionary self-detonating device designed to extinguish a ...
The problem with driving any full-size Pickup Truck or Sport Utility Vehicle is that when you are ...
Wait no longer - the 2021 Rideau Canal & Lower Ottawa River PORTS Guide will be available for ...