Halman21250Nov2By Lloyd Hircock

One of the first boats I considered buying during my search for the perfect ""starter"" many sailing years ago was the traditional ""North Sea Double-Ender,"" a design similar to the Halman 21. To me, it possessed the quintessential qualities necessary for the perfect offshore vessel - transom-hung steering, long keel, curving sheer, an almost plumb entry, and powerfully built.

A stout and hardy vessel to be sure; the right vessel to carry me unscathed to the destination of my choice. But I didn't buy her and unfortunately I never got to sail the yacht. On a lazy August day, 15 years later, I renewed an old acquaintance and finally test-sailed such a design.

The Halman 21 is built by the Halman Manufacturing Co. in Beamsville, Ontario. Purchased by Richard Navin in 1978, the company also manufactures the famous 24-foot Shark, the Halman Niagara 26, the Bluejacket 23 Motorsailor, the Henley 20, and the Horizon 31 cutter in its 8,000-square-foot facility. The plant consists of a complete cabinetry and paint shop and enough floor space to lay-up three designs simultaneously. "We're small," says Navin, the hands-on owner, "but I believe that's good for our customers. We can service everything we manufacture - and if there are warranty problems I personally get involved for the duration."

While not exactly a household brand name, the Halman 21 has attracted a following. Either you like the traditional design or you don't &&emdash; there's no middle ground. New owner Murray Belisario purchased a Halman 21 in the spring of 1989. "It was our first sailboat," the enthusiastic owner told me. "My wife and I saw the yacht sitting outside Richard's place and bought it - that simple. I had seen the Nordica (a similar design) before, and liked the lines." And reports from owners indicate one of the benefits of owning a traditional vessel is the buoyancy of the resale market.

The boat was introduced in 1977 as the Halman 20, and its reincarnation as the Halman 21 four years ago provides an interesting perspective on the boating market. A U.S. dealer "who thought we should dress the boat up", according to Navin, placed a custom order for a 20 with a bowsprit and increased sail area to enhance sailing ability in light air. He also wanted a higher standard of finish, which included bronze port lights and halyards led back to the cockpit. Navin was tentative ("I was really reluctant to put the bowsprit on, because it might affect sailing performance") but he agreed, and the result was a revelation. The more upmarket version, dubbed the Halman 21, was an immediate success. At a time when builders were trying to woo customers by building cheaper boats, Halman scored by building a more expensive one. "The moment we sold a 21," he says, "we never sold another 20."

The one-piece hull is manufactured using 4 1/2 oz. mat bonded with polyester resin to 24 oz. woven roving and 1 1/2 oz. mat throughout. Extra 24 oz. roving is employed below the waterline. The bilge and keel area is further strengthened using unidirectional glass, stem to stern. The deck is reinforced with a core of endgrain balsa sheets.

The roomy cockpit is deep with high moulded coamings surrounding the perimeter. Wide, flat side decks make the journey to the mast and bow area easy and safe. All deck hardware is first class. Here the builder has gone all out, installing bronze ports, winches and cleats throughout. Controls lead aft and are rigged outside cockpit seating space - away from the traffic flow.

The cabin interior is appointed with teak solids and veneers. A white vinyl headliner and moulded pan serve to accentuate the darker wood tones of the strip panelling fastened to the hull walls. Head room is a modest five feet, enabling comfortable sitting. Ventilation is adequate. With six opening ports and the cabin hatch cracked a decent cross draft is achieved. One of my pet peeves is lack of sufficient ventilation. Thankfully the Halman 21 is well vented and should prove to be airy, even during those heavy sultry days.

Sleeping accommodations are understandably limited for a boat this size, but the design will serve well as a weekender. In keeping to scale a small galley has been fitted to port.

Standard equipment includes an ice box, single sink and plenty of storage space for utensils above and below the galley area. A fitted recirculating head is stationed in the V-berth. The deck-stepped single-spreader masthead rig employs twin lowers fore and aft, and a 7/8 upper.

The mainsail is large for a masthead design, but with a 2,500-pound payload perched on a 21 foot frame with a long keel, the vessel requires all the power the 220 square feet of sail can generate to maintain speed.

Unfortunately, as with the Precision 23, I picked a calm day for the test-sail. The wind was a no-show. Although the air filled in every few minutes it was a teaser with never any great velocity above 5 knots. Nevertheless we sailed smartly onto a close reach with good burst of speed.

Owner reports indicate the yacht sails well in a freshening breeze and paces well to weather. Certainly, when sailing off the wind the yacht should track exceedingly well. I found the yacht well-founded and a comfortable sailing vessel.

To contend with dead calms or uncooperative zephyrs, buyers have the option of ordering a 9-hp Yanmar IGM diesel. Historically Navin says only about two percent of customers have opted for the diesel, although in recent years that proportion has risen to about ten percent as the boat has attracted a more affluent buyer looking for a mini-motorsailer. The boat otherwise only requires a 6-hp outboard for auxiliary power, but Navin recommends a 7.5 or 8-hp model to get electric start.

The design makes trailering a snap. The long keel, modest draft and moderate beam positions it well on most single or double axle trailers with a 3,000-pound load capacity. While the Halman 21 is not everyone's cup of tea, the relative security of design and proven sailing ability, especially in a heavy seaway, will appeal to first-time sailors with small children who enjoy wandering down the asphalt highways in search of more challenging sailing venues. It will also appeal to veteran sailors desiring a strong, compact sailboat up to the challenge of stiff breezes. The price is also right, with a fairly completely equipped boat (including sails, but less engine and trailer) listed at $20,900. I probably should have bought one.

Originally published in Canadian Yachting's March/April 1991 issue.

Specifications

LOA            21 ft, 2 in.

LOD             19 ft 10 in.

Beam             7 ft 9 in.

Draft             2 ft 10 in.

Displacement             2,500 lbs.

Ballast             1,000 lbs.

Sail Area            220 sq ft.

 

 

Related Articles

 

 

X Shore Eelex 8000By Andy Adams

100% Electric performance available now

When we arranged to interview the designer and manufacturer to write a profile of the X Shore Eelex 8000 for the June 2021 issue of Canadian Yachting magazine, it was on the understanding that we always prefer to actually drive and experience the boats we write about, and we were especially keen to drive the X Shore when BCI Marine here in Canada, got their first boat from Sweden.

There has been a lot of media attention around everything electric lately, especially electric vehicles, but so far, most electric boats are a concept, not yet a reality. The X Shore Eelex 8000 is a reality and a very impressive one at that.

Read More

 

 

Beneteau Oceanis 34.1

 

Beneteau Oceanis 34.1By Zuzana Prochazka

Boats have been in high demand for the past two years and there’s no sign of this easing. Sailboats, that can move with the power of the wind, have made an especially significant comeback probably because of the high prices of fuel.

Even more interesting is the increased interest in smaller models that have been doing well at recent boat shows. These compact cruisers have definitely held their own even among the 50-foot behemoths at the docks. A good example of this is Beneteau’s new Oceanis 34.1, the second smallest in the line. 

Read More

Destinations

  • Prev
Cowichan Bay is a waterfront village with a row of shops, artisan products, marine supplies and a ...
Instant towns have sprung up in the past, especially on the BC coast. In the late 1850s, Victoria ...
Following the War of 1812, a battle that Canada narrowly won against the United States, the ...
You’ve weathered COVID and you’re ready to book your charter to paradise. You’ve done some ...
If you are looking for an interesting destination for a weekend trip or longer, Quebec City will ...
A holiday often is defined by the experiences we make in unique and beautiful settings. But what ...
St Vincent and the Grenadines is open to tourists and Horizon Yacht Charters are looking forward to ...

Cowichan BayText and Photos by Marianne Scott

Cowichan Bay is a waterfront village with a row of shops, artisan products, marine supplies and a variety of places to eat. It also has a delightful Maritime Centre. You can easily spend a day or more here at one of three marinas hosting transient moorage. The place feels like an old-fashioned fishing village.

We arrived at this quaint hamlet on a calm day when the sun burned off twists of mist and created undulating oval diamonds on the wavelets. From the water, the village looks enticing with its dense jumble of colourful character buildings, float homes and houses-on-stilts lining the coast.

Read More

Lifestyle

  • Prev
Boat names and puns go together like …. Well, like nothing else. Here’s a couple shared by our pal ...
Frequent Windsor racing contributor to Sailing in Canada Roger Renaud, caught this gorgeous ...
The Kingston Yacht Club (KYC) celebrated its 125th anniversary in the summer of 2021, in all the ...
A study on water levels projects an unprecedented drop of water levels on Lakes Michigan-Huron and ...
Ahoy me hearties. June is Sailpast month, so Keelly and her pal Tracey were themed out as (not ...
Last month, Canadian Country Singer Brian John Hardwood, released his new single “Rich”, featuring ...
Things are busy on the Trent already and it’s barely June. Mike Gridley sent us this shot last ...
From cottage boats to luxury cruisers, there have been a host of major design changes over the past ...
Thanks to Louise from Gyles Sails and Marine for catching us up on this weekend’s massive parts ...
The marine industry provides exciting opportunities for Canadians. Every month CYOB will introduce ...

DIY & How to

  • Prev
Unlike a car that moves (and requires control) left and right (and perhaps, if you’re an ...
Our boats are now on the water after a couple of really unusual years – if we did get out it was ...
Last issue of CYOB, we discussed stay and shroud tension and how these adjustments can affect ...
I was recently reading a number of Facebook posts from sailboat owners’ groups, wondering why their ...
Sails are attached to the sailboat rig using several different systems. Let’s begin with mainsail. ...
I’ve always thought that where safety is concerned aboard, it should be the same whether the boat ...
It seems like everyone has their “guy”, usually a marine surveyor they either know personally or ...
Mechanics use a lot of strange terms when describing problems aboard. An engine may be skipping or ...
Full disclosure and confession: I enjoy watching boat failures and crashes on YouTube! As long as ...
As I write this, boat yards are checking over systems, and re-familiarizing themselves with the ...

Marine SurveyingStory and photos by Timothy J.S. Martin

It seems like everyone has their “guy”, usually a marine surveyor they either know personally or have been referred to by another boater (or someone in the marine or insurance industries). Marine surveyors are often hired based on this type of referral, rather than on the merits of their qualifications and skills.

I often hear boaters express their displeasure about an experience where a marine surveyor “condemned” a boat, or the surveyor was viewed as unreasonable in relation to their recommendations. As a result, surveyors known to be less thorough and less detailed in their work tend to be favoured by boaters, especially for insurance surveys. 

Read More

 

  

Marine Products

  • Prev
Words of exasperation wafting across a marina often signal a boat owner fighting with a jammed ...
Chatting at the club bar last week, the subject of current boat projects popped up. One boater ...
Books to read while you’re semi-snoozing in the cockpit on a lazy summer afternoon. Some diversion, ...
With Albin Group Marine's new line of Cartridge Submersible Bilge Pumps, Aerator Pumps and Twinport ...
The Freedom LTE-A is a Dual Band MU-MIMO 2.4Ghz + 5Ghz WiFi transceiver with a built-in universal ...
Three books in a series of books by Canadian author Erik Skovgaard. These three books, as the ...
The little darlings can’t wait to get on the boat. Just make sure they have properly fitting PFDs ...
With a bold, fresh look and key features, the new JBL-R4500 is the latest in the WAKE Series of ...
When the twist-type connector was invented in 1938, production boats were made of wood and didn't ...
Luxor Marine & RV products offer boat owners an innovative architecturally pleasing range of ...

News

  • Prev
As bonus of my journalistic responsibilities here at CY Media, I occasionally get called upon to do ...
Professor Charles Spence, from Oxford University’s Crossmodal Research Laboratory, has researched ...
Cut out for adventure and marine activities, the NC 895 Sport offers seriously convincing arguments ...
The Canada Games, held every two years, alternating between summer and winter, are the largest ...
The Monaco Energy Boat Challenge (MEBC) took place in the principality July 8 to 13 and shows how ...
Parks Canada has just released an Up-to-Date Big Chute Marine Railway Status Webpage with weekly ...
Groupe Beneteau is launching a partnership with Quebec-based Vision Marine Technologies to develop ...
Portsmouth Harbour in Kingston was the site of this weekend’s Canadian Waszp Class Championship ...
A resistance force has mobilised in the Dutch city of Rotterdam. Threats of crowds egging Jeff ...
For more than 18 years since the launch of the first model, the Elan Impression line was one of the ...

RS Electric BoatsSailGP, the international racing series featuring high speed F50 wingsailed catamarans, is partnering with RS Electric Boats – sister brand of sailboat manufacturer RS Sailing – to use the Pulse 63 electric RIB as chase, coach and support boats.

RS Electric Boats will supply SailGP with four Pulse 63s, which were designed to be electric boats from the outset. The unique aerodynamic hull form is designed to support the weight of the batteries while allowing rapid acceleration, functional speeds up to 23 knots and ample range.

 

 

Read More