Luna 24/SL Picture 1April 28 2016

A measure of comfort added without subtracting racing exitment.
By Carol Nickle and Bryan Gooderham
The Luna 24/SL brochure emphasizes “cruising comfort for four” but it’s some high- performance cruising! The 24/SL is more conventional version of the high-tech Luna 24 that has been a convincing and North American Quarter-Ton Championships in the past few years. Although it has a pleasant and comfy interior for 24 footer, the 24/SL will still provide plenty of racing excitement.
“SL” stands for “street legal,” indicating that the design of the 24/SL incorporates creature comforts not found in the all-out Luna 24 racer. The 24 was designed in 1981 by E.G van de Stadt & Partners from Holland for Gilles Kaars- Sijpestijen of Luna Yachts. Kaars- Sijpeseijn, who successfully raced half-ton yachts in Europe, deliberately chose a high-technology racing design featuring an aluminum space frame, open transom and stripped-out interior. The 24 has a very tall three- quarter fractional rig, giving plenty of sail area. Its hull shape is a typical modern IOR with a fine bow, eight-foot, three-inch beam, very flat bilges and high-aspect-ratio fin keel and spade rudder. Overall displacement is modest at 2,800 pounds, but stability is ensured by a ballast ratio of over 50 per cent in the 4 ½ foot, six inch- draft lead keel.
The 24/SL achieves a great deal more liveability than the 24 with relatively few concessions to the basic design. The hull shape is essentially identical, with the trailing edge of the transom trimmed just five inches to accommodate an outboard motor more easily decreasing sailing area to 288 square feet. The transom has been closed in and the deck and cabintop have been modified to provide a more comfortable cockpit and greater interior volume. Overall displacement has been held constant with the ballast ratio decreased a little to compensate for the extra weight in hull, deck and interior. Although the 24 has a sensational racing record (1st and 2nd at both the Canadian and North American Quarter-ton Championships), Kaars-Sijpesteijn found that only a dozen or so were sold because the Canadian boating public wanted a more all-round boat for general family use as well as high-performance competition. In contrast, a fleet of about 100 of the 24 has developed in South Africa, produced by another builder. Hence, the SL version was created to broaden market appeal in Canada.

 


Luna24/SL External BackWe had looked forward to a really spirited ride for our sail review of the 24/SL, but as luck would have it, it was scheduled during a spell of hot, hazy summer weather with little more than a zephyr of wind all week. Nonetheless we enjoyed a light-air sail and were impressed with the handling and responsiveness of the boat. The tiller has a positive, comfortable feel and the boat is nicely sensitive to the helm. With a fairly broad beam relative to its water­line beam, it's also quite sensitive to weight distribution of the crew. Even in the light wind, we thought it accelerated well as the breeze freshened a little. We checked up on heavy-air performance with John Ogden, owner of a Luna 24 he has sailed for the past couple of seasons. He was enthusiastic, telling us that his boat is very stable and "handles like a sports car," even in a blow. The cockpit of the 24/SL has comfortable seats and unobstructed roominess since the main traveler bridge has been moved forward from mid-cockpit on the 24 to just aft of the companionway in the latest 24/SL. The deck surface curves up to the cockpit coaming, providing a convenient perch for helmsman and crew when the boat is heeled. Mainsheet and traveler are well-arranged, and a coarse and fine tuning mainsheet system is part of standard equipment. Deck hardware is of a uniformly high standard, with halyards and other lines led aft through a good stopper setup to halyard winches mounted on the cabintop just forward of the cockpit.

 

 


Luna24/SL External MastThe bow pulpit and stanchion bases on the aft quarters are sturdy and well fastened through the deck. Deck surfaces, seats and the cockpit floor feature great molded-in non-skid lots of texture to provide grip, but not so rough as to harm clothes or exposed skin. The nonskid even extends to the outboard motor bracket, which supplies a foot­hold on the reverse-sloping transom for lifting or starting the motor. The engine and fuel tank can be stored in a large locker under the cockpit floor. Alternatively, an inboard engine could be located there, but Luna doesn't recommend it since it would add a lot of weight and expense on a relatively small boat.
The interior of the SL is attractive in a simple, functional style. There are roomy, six-foot, six-inch quarterberths to port and starboard that double as settees. The galley space lies forward with a sink to port and small stove and counter to starboard. The cooler is stored underneath the companionway step. A reasonably sized V berth fills the fore­peak, with the head located underneath the open end of the V. Luna has avoided the expense and complications of plumbing by using a portable water container, a dishpan-style sink and a self-contained head unit. The interior of the cabin is finished in an off-white textured gelcoat, practical and easy to clean. The surprisingly large windows let in plenty of light and a first-rate forehatch establishes a good ventilation flow. Despite its somewhat limited interior volume, the 24/SL has lots and lots of storage space-lockers under all bunks and settees, a generous shelf with deep fiddles along each side of the cabin behind the settee, and large compartments on each side aft of the quarter berths.

 

Luna24/SL Internal Living Area On the day of our sail review we also had a tour of the Luna Yachts plant in Oakville and saw several boats being built. Construction is all hand-laid-up fiberglass with balsa core for the deck and a material trademarked "Coremat" used in the hull. It is a lightweight textile material that has obvious advantages in its flexibility around curves and corners. All major components for the interior are bonded with epoxy to sub­frames of aluminum tubing. The alumi­num space frame method is one used in a number of larger racing boats to achieve both strength and lightness. In the Luna 24 and 24/SL, we saw this technique used for the first time on a boat of this size. We can endorse Luna's claim that the "end result is light, strong and built to last."
We expect the Luna 24 or 24 /SL to appeal to boat buyers with a reasonable amount of racing experience who can appreciate its outstanding performance, quality construction and equipment. John Ogden fits this description, having owned a number of competitive boats in the quarter-ton range. He was looking for a high-tech boat that would be really fast, but also well-built and well­serviced. He says, "The Luna 24 exceeded my expectations. It's a world­class boat." So it was a bit of a surprise to talk to George Schroeder and find that the 24/SL he bought early in 1983 is the first sailboat he's owned and that he had virtually no sailing experience when he first acquired it! Nevertheless, he actively cruises and races it and has become an enthusiastic sailor. With some help from more experienced crew members he finds he can beat everything but the Luna 24s in quarterton competition. He also finds it extremely comfortable for day cruising and short overnight trips, and claims to have slept up to seven on it-all of which shows that even though this is a high-perform­ance boat, it needn't intimidate the nov­ice sailor.
Luna24/SL Internal Kitchen AreaAt $24,950 for the 24/SL sailaway package (which includes main and working jib) this yacht is not inexpensive. However, for the competitive sailor who appreciates quality construction and demands a boat that can win, but who also wants to take family or friends for a pleasant and comfortable cruise, the Luna 24/SL should prove very hard to beat.
Carol Nickle is an independent financial consultant. Bryan Gooderham is the owner of Bryan Gooderham Yacht Services and a member of the crew of the sorc and Admiral’s Cup Racer Amazing Grace.
Photo Captions: The 24/SL’s divided galley locates the sink to port and small stove with counter space to starboard. The Sloped deck surface provides a convenient perch for helmsman and crew when the boat is heeled. In newer 24/SL models, the main traveler bridge has been moved forward to just aft of the companionway, making the cockpit roomier. Deck hardware is of uniformly high standard, with halyards and other lines led aft through a good stopper setup to halyard winches mounted on the cabintop. The interior is attractive in a simple, functional style. The head is located underneath the open end of the v berth. The aluminum space frame is used in larger racing boats to achieve both strength and lightness.

Originally Published in Canadian Yachting’s October 1984 issue.


Specifications:
Sail
LOA..................23ft 6in
Waterline...........18ft 6in
Beam.................8ft 3in
Displacement......2,800lbs
Ballast...............1,200lbs
Draft...................4ft 5in
Berths................4

Critical Sail Measurements:

I.........................27ft 6in
J........................8ft 11in
P........................28ft 6in
E........................10ft 3in
Sail Area..............288 ft2
(Main &Jib)

Ratings:

IOR............ Approx. 18.3
MORC.........Approx. 21.2
PHRF..........Approx. 180

Price ..........$24,950
(1984)

 

 

 

 

 

Related Articles

 

 

Viko S35

By Katherine Stone

I am lucky to have the opportunity to helm many types of boats. I am even more lucky to sail boats on champagne fall days when many boats are either being hauled for the winter, or are already under shrink-wrap.

Not only are there great winds – usually offshore, but welcome sunshine and open waters with few boats out enjoying the last days of September. Joining me for the test sail of the Viko S35 was the former publisher of Canadian Yachting, Greg Nicoll, and the Canadian Viko Yachts representative, Eric Beauregard, who had driven down from Montreal.

Read More

 

 

Four Winns H4

 

Four Winns H4By Andy Adams

The well-known Four Winns brand is now a part of the international boatbuilder Groupe Beneteau and the new H4 is a great example of how the design and engineering resources of Beneteau can up the game even for a brand like Four Winns that has a long and distinguished history.

The Cadillac Michigan-built H4 is a brand-new design this year and we think it's especially handsome. The vertical stem bow is all new and innovative. It is a design feature that was chosen to give Four Winns and the H4 a sense of modern and contemporary look while the stern remains more traditional. 

Read More

Destinations

  • Prev
It was the last day of August and we were in Little Current heading south. Our Lasalle winter haul ...
Cowichan Bay is a waterfront village with a row of shops, artisan products, marine supplies and a ...
Instant towns have sprung up in the past, especially on the BC coast. In the late 1850s, Victoria ...
Following the War of 1812, a battle that Canada narrowly won against the United States, the ...
You’ve weathered COVID and you’re ready to book your charter to paradise. You’ve done some ...
If you are looking for an interesting destination for a weekend trip or longer, Quebec City will ...
A holiday often is defined by the experiences we make in unique and beautiful settings. But what ...
St Vincent and the Grenadines is open to tourists and Horizon Yacht Charters are looking forward to ...

West Side Story

by Jennifer M. Smith, drone photos by Alex Nikolajevich

It was the last day of August and we were in Little Current heading south. Our Lasalle winter haul out was still over a month away. The question was: where to now? Friends in Meaford often suggested we sail in for a visit. We never had because we’d always moved north-south on the east side of Georgian Bay. This year we were up for something different. This was the perfect opportunity to cruise the west side of the bay.

We made the 10 a.m. bridge out of Little Current and motor-sailed east southeast in light northerlies. We’d often sailed past Snug Harbour, a nearly land-locked anchorage on the north side of Lansdowne Channel because the chart suggested we’d never make it in there with our six-foot draft. 

Read More

Lifestyle

  • Prev
Boat names and puns go together like …. Well, like nothing else. Here’s a couple shared by our pal ...
Frequent Windsor racing contributor to Sailing in Canada Roger Renaud, caught this gorgeous ...
The Kingston Yacht Club (KYC) celebrated its 125th anniversary in the summer of 2021, in all the ...
A study on water levels projects an unprecedented drop of water levels on Lakes Michigan-Huron and ...
Ahoy me hearties. June is Sailpast month, so Keelly and her pal Tracey were themed out as (not ...
You’ve invested thousands and thousands of dollars into your boat so naturally, you want to find ...
Last month, Canadian Country Singer Brian John Hardwood, released his new single “Rich”, featuring ...
Things are busy on the Trent already and it’s barely June. Mike Gridley sent us this shot last ...
From cottage boats to luxury cruisers, there have been a host of major design changes over the past ...
Thanks to Louise from Gyles Sails and Marine for catching us up on this weekend’s massive parts ...

DIY & How to

  • Prev
Unlike a car that moves (and requires control) left and right (and perhaps, if you’re an ...
Our boats are now on the water after a couple of really unusual years – if we did get out it was ...
Last issue of CYOB, we discussed stay and shroud tension and how these adjustments can affect ...
I was recently reading a number of Facebook posts from sailboat owners’ groups, wondering why their ...
After 27 years of sun and traffic, the cockpit floor on Aquaholic was starting to look faded and ...
Sails are attached to the sailboat rig using several different systems. Let’s begin with mainsail. ...
I’ve always thought that where safety is concerned aboard, it should be the same whether the boat ...
Corners like it’s on rails. You can almost see it. A car with a low centre of gravity takes a ...
It seems like everyone has their “guy”, usually a marine surveyor they either know personally or ...
Mechanics use a lot of strange terms when describing problems aboard. An engine may be skipping or ...

Supplies and Colour Matching

by Marc Robic

After 27 years of sun and traffic, the cockpit floor on Aquaholic was starting to look faded and had many small pinholes and minor surface cracks. These pinholes are mostly caused by small air pockets that lay just below the gelcoat surface. Of course, this is exacerbated by particles such as small rocks or debris under shoes, dropped winch handles, etc.

Luckily, Catalina Yachts is still very much in business and are very helpful when owners have questions or need parts. I ordered a small quantity of original formula Catalina grey and white gelcoat for my model and year.

Read More

 

  

Marine Products

  • Prev
Words of exasperation wafting across a marina often signal a boat owner fighting with a jammed ...
Chatting at the club bar last week, the subject of current boat projects popped up. One boater ...
Books to read while you’re semi-snoozing in the cockpit on a lazy summer afternoon. Some diversion, ...
With Albin Group Marine's new line of Cartridge Submersible Bilge Pumps, Aerator Pumps and Twinport ...
The Freedom LTE-A is a Dual Band MU-MIMO 2.4Ghz + 5Ghz WiFi transceiver with a built-in universal ...
Three books in a series of books by Canadian author Erik Skovgaard. These three books, as the ...
The little darlings can’t wait to get on the boat. Just make sure they have properly fitting PFDs ...
With a bold, fresh look and key features, the new JBL-R4500 is the latest in the WAKE Series of ...
When the twist-type connector was invented in 1938, production boats were made of wood and didn't ...
Luxor Marine & RV products offer boat owners an innovative architecturally pleasing range of ...

News

  • Prev
As bonus of my journalistic responsibilities here at CY Media, I occasionally get called upon to do ...
Professor Charles Spence, from Oxford University’s Crossmodal Research Laboratory, has researched ...
Cut out for adventure and marine activities, the NC 895 Sport offers seriously convincing arguments ...
The Canada Games, held every two years, alternating between summer and winter, are the largest ...
The Monaco Energy Boat Challenge (MEBC) took place in the principality July 8 to 13 and shows how ...
Parks Canada has just released an Up-to-Date Big Chute Marine Railway Status Webpage with weekly ...
Groupe Beneteau is launching a partnership with Quebec-based Vision Marine Technologies to develop ...
Portsmouth Harbour in Kingston was the site of this weekend’s Canadian Waszp Class Championship ...
A resistance force has mobilised in the Dutch city of Rotterdam. Threats of crowds egging Jeff ...
For more than 18 years since the launch of the first model, the Elan Impression line was one of the ...

RS Electric BoatsSailGP, the international racing series featuring high speed F50 wingsailed catamarans, is partnering with RS Electric Boats – sister brand of sailboat manufacturer RS Sailing – to use the Pulse 63 electric RIB as chase, coach and support boats.

RS Electric Boats will supply SailGP with four Pulse 63s, which were designed to be electric boats from the outset. The unique aerodynamic hull form is designed to support the weight of the batteries while allowing rapid acceleration, functional speeds up to 23 knots and ample range.

 

 

Read More