Mainship 34 Trawler - running

By Andy Adams

The term "fast trawler" might at first seem to come from the same family is the term "jumbo shrimp" but there really is a good reason for a fast trawler.

Recently, there has been a groundswell of interest in trawler boats because they deliver a unique combination of seaworthiness, comfort and space in a fuel-efficient package.  They also suit the demographics of the North American population with an increasing number of people reaching retirement at earlier ages.

Trawlers are often referred to as blue water cruising boats because they're well-suited to handling rough water and offshore conditions.  Taking a Mainship 34 Trawler down the Intercoastal Waterway to the Carolinas, Florida or even out to the Caribbean is a very realistic goal, even for those new to cruising.

Fast trawlers are designed with more support in the aft hull sections and given sufficient power, can move from displacement speeds of 8 or 10 mph to full planing at over 20 mph.

The ability to go quickly is a desirable trait because bad weather can move in quickly. The safety and convenience of having a fast trawler is easily understood.

Our test boat was equipped with virtually every option including air-conditioning and twin engines and the price tag came in at approximately $350,000. 

Mainship 34 Trawler - GalleyIn the world of trawler design, form follows function and the exterior spaces are as much meant for your living accommodations as the interior. The Mainship 34 has a proper transom door from the swim platform into the cockpit. That area has high sides for a secure feeling and is shaded by the bridge overhang all the way across and up the side decks to midships.

Mainship has done a great job with the staircase to the flying bridge. Use it like stairs or turn around and face the stairs to climb up or down in rough water as though you were clinging to a ladder.  The last three steps in this staircase, located on the starboard side of the cockpit, are a hatch that lifts up to reveal conveniently located battery switches and for access to the engine room.

Your six-foot tall 200-pound boat tester found it a tight fit to get into the engine room and the ceiling is fairly low.  Making up for that, Mainship has installed six lights.  It's not difficult to reach the fuel strainers, batteries, or the water pump system and there is a sight gauge on the diesel fuel tank that is also handy feature. You can get all the way around the engines for service; you just have to do it from a crouching position.  The ceiling is heavily insulated and to keep the interior as quiet as possible, there are no engine hatch openings in the salon.

Back to the top sides, the wide side decks and raised bulwarks with their 1 1/4 inch diameter welded stainless steel rails give the 34 trawler the feeling of being a small ship.  You can really get around the exterior of this boat and there is a cabin door on the starboard side near the interior helm and plenty of room to sit out on the front deck while cruising.

The boat is well-suited to anchoring out and has an electric windlass with deck controls as well as controls at the upper and lower helms. There are two large cleats forward plus an utterly massive Samson Post.

The flying bridge is very large for this size of boat. There is an L-shaped seat on the port side that's wide enough to be a sunbed and has a large amount of storage under the cushions. You get a companion seat on both port and starboard sides flanking the center mounted helm seat.  

Mainship 34 Trawler - HeadThe large binnacle has twin Raymarine C80 screens for radar and a chart plotter, an autopilot, VHF radio, large Danforth compass, electrically controlled spotlight, controls for the electric windlass, and JVC audio system. The Yanmars were equipped with ZF electronic controls. Chart tables on either side flank the dashboard and the layout is comfortable for standing or sitting operation.  Our test boat had the optional Bimini top and full enclosure.  A fold up picnic table is included as is a pedestal mounted Magma barbecue and cutting board.

Things are equally good below. 

Salon access is through folding doors in the aft bulkhead. Side windows are very large, slide open and have screens. The test boat had the optional Hide-A-Bed couch, high-low table and two attractive wicker chairs to create a dining area for up to six people. An entertainment system and the electrical panel are by the bulkhead.

The test boat had the interior helm that is beautifully finished in varnished cherry with an impressive ships style wheel.  It has an excellent view in all directions and if the weather was too cold, too hot or too rainy, you can still run the boat from here with ease.

Opposite is a convenient breakfast bar with two little stools on the port side and ahead is the U-shaped galley, down a couple of steps.  I like this type of layout because the cook is still part of the party but there is a lot of light and height over the cooking facilities to keep cooking odors away from interior surfaces.

The galley was equipped with a Sharp carousel microwave, two large under floor lockers, a refrigerator with freezer section, a single stainless steel sink of generous size, two burner stove, Corian counter tops with fiddles to keep things from landing on the Everwear Teak and Holly floor; all in all, very nice.

The forward cabin has a shaped twin birth in the center with very good access on both sides, making it easy make the bed.  Ventilation is through two portholes and an overhead hatch. The cedar lined locker is modestly sized but there's a bit more storage as well.

Mainship however, gives you a great head. The 34 has a fully enclosed shower stall, opening porthole, sink in a vanity and more.  You can really use this head, even under way.  It functions as it should and that comment could apply to virtually every part of the Mainship 34.

So, how does this all go?  The twin 240 hp Yanmar diesel engines fire up easily with virtually no smoke or smell.  These new technology diesels are delightful to live with.  The twin engines make maneuvering the Mainship quite easy and there is a full keel for accurate tracking. Running the speeds, we were traveling 4.2 mph at idle and at approximately 2000 rpm we were making 9.2 mph at a very quiet 82 dB.

The test boat ran up to 3750 rpm doing 24.4 mph.  By putting a little tab down we could back off to an 18.5 mph cruising speed at 3250 and we recorded a very livable 89 dB in the salon.  That is impressively quiet for the performance.

Mainship 34 Trawler - SalonIn terms of sea keeping qualities, the Mainship 34 Trawler tracks a course very nicely and the hull has a pocket drive design for a shallow draft and a shaft angle that improves efficiency.  Hydraulic steering was light and comfortable to use and the ZF controls are very precise.  On high-speed turns, the keel throws weight to the outside, keeping the boat virtually level. On really hot, cold or wet days, you might find it more comfortable to operate from the lower helm. Nice to have the choice!

All in all, Mainship has delivered remarkable accommodation and performance in a size range that will be easy to handle and economical too.

 

Originally published in Canadian Yachting’s November 2006 issue.

 

Performance

Twin Yanmar 240 hp turbo diesels

RPM MPH

1000 4.2

1250         5.7

1500 6.8

1750 7.9

2000 10.5

2500 11.2

2750         13.0

3000 14.4

Mainship 34 Trawler - Bridge3250 18.5

3500         20.2

3750 24.4

 

Specifications

Length 34'0" /  10.36 m

Length overall 36'1" / 11 m

Beam         14'2" /  4.32 m

Draft         33” /0.99 m

Displacement 20,000 lbs / 9072 kg

Fuel capacity 250 gal / 946 L

Water capacity 70 gal / 265 L

Holding tank 34 gal / 129 L

Price as tested "  $396,762 CDN Dollars

Test boat provided by and price quoted by Angus Yachts Power and Sail

www.angusyachts.com

Speeds measured by Ray Marine

 

Photo Captions

Photo 1 – The Mainship 34 Trawler running.

Photo 2 - A real highlight is the very functional galley with good storage and counter space typical of much larger yachts.

Photo 3 - The enclosed shower stall is a usable size and seems much larger thanks to the acrylic wall and door. The designers wanted to make all the spaces a realistic and functional size in spite of the trim 34’ length.

Photo 4 - The salon is very spacious for a 34 footer and has such great trawler features as a wooden ship’s wheel, interior helm beside a cabin door, large overhead teak grab bar (not visible in this shot) and generous side glass.

Photo 5 - The bridge is a key area when running or relaxing and this one has a lot of open space, seats wide enough to sun tan and room to entertain. The three pedestal seats swivel to join the party. 

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