Aug 22, 2017

Chester Race Week - Day 1Chester Race Week wrapped up on Saturday, August 19th after four days of racing which saw everything from sunshine and gentle winds, to near gales, waves and rain. Michael Dunn covered the event and here is his day by day review:

Day 1, Wednesday, August 16th – Sailors and sailing enthusiasts from as far away as New Zealand, London (UK), Vancouver, Palm Beach (FL) and Rhode Island mixed with salts from across the Eastern Seaboard today in the village of Chester, Nova Scotia, Canada, to kick off Chester Race Week 2017.
One hundred and nineteen boats skippered and crewed by Olympians, international regatta champions and sailing enthusiasts of all levels - including first-timers - enjoyed a sunny day with light wind and flat seas.
“We travel to Chester Race Week every year because of the world-class competitors, the amazing sailing conditions, and the fun - we think we got a top-5 finish today,” said Vancouver-based Drew Mitchell, skipper of the Bluenose Class Feather, on loan for Race Week from Carlisle Norwood.
Drew grew up sailing in Lunenburg, has sailed in Russia and across the Pacific, and now lives in Vancouver, where he leads operations for North Sails. He is racing with his brother Karl Mitchell and Brian Trubovich, a friend who flew to Chester from Auckland, New Zealand, specifically for Chester Race Week.
“Sailing Chester Race Week is a fun tradition. As a sailmaker, most of my sailing is with customers, so it’s a real treat to be able to sail with my brother and friends in my home waters.”
Drew’s brother Karl met Brian sailing at the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron.
“I also met Chester’s Victoria Dimmick and some friends in Auckland where they crewed on my Ross 35,” the seasoned Kiwi sailor said on the deck of the Chester Yacht Club. “When Victoria heard I was heading to a regatta in Spain this fall, she invited me to make a detour to Chester Race Week. I like race weeks - lots of short, tactical, competitive races with lots of land-based fun. It’s been fabulous - great conditions, beautiful islands - my photos are making my mates at home very jealous.”

Chester Race Week - Day 2Day 2, Thursday August 17th – Two-to-three metre waves and strong winds gusting to 25+ knots (46+ km per hour) changed racing plans for several fleets on Day 2 of Chester Race Week, forcing skippers of some classic boats to retire from the race to avoid damage. Some didn’t escape unscathed with steel winches ripping out of fibreglass decks for some, and sails shredding for others. The Chester Yacht Club commodore’s tender sunk at the dock.
“It’s in high winds like these when you discover your gear’s weak points and preventative maintenance saves you time and money,” said 30-year Chester Race Week veteran Colin Mann, whose J/92 Poohsticks sails out of the Lunenburg Yacht Club. “We clocked a top hull speed of 14.9 knots out there today - it was a great ride that left us grinning ear to ear.”

Chester Race Week - Day 3Day 3, Friday August 18th – After high winds gusted 25+ knots on Thursday, Chester Race Week sailors gathered at the Chester Yacht Club (CYC) Friday morning to share stories, lick wounds and compare notes on the previous day.
The Bluenose fleet started early and were able to add three extra races for a total of six, completely recovering after all three races were cancelled Thursday. The 22-boat fleet could be seen from the CYC, packed with visitors, as the 24-foot sloops tacked across Chester’s picturesque front harbour.
“After yesterday’s mayhem, today’s conditions were perfect for keel boat racing with flat seas with winds building from five to nine knots for Alpha fleet’s first race of four miles, then 10 to 12 knots that stretched the race 2 to six miles – Mahone Bay is beautiful and reliable,” said Alpha Course Race Officer Ken Legler of Medford, Massachusetts, who coaches the Tufts University Sailing Team during the school year. “As a result, we had really good starts, close racing and close finish times, which, for me as a fan, means great racing,” the five-year veteran Chester Race Week race officer added.
Musicians, pop-up shops, art lessons, winery samplings and food trucks were arrayed on the CYC grounds Friday afternoon for the Party on the Deck, a series of attractions designed for non-sailing Chester villagers and visitors.
“Chester Race week is a major national event and we want it to be accessible and fun for everyone, even for those not sailing,” said Cynthia Spraggs, chair of Chester Race Week 2017 land operations. “The Party on the Deck draws people looking to watch the races from shore, enjoy great food, music, shopping, and be part of the festive Chester Race Week summer buzz in this beautiful Mahone Bay setting.”

Chester Race Week 2017Day 4, Saturday, August 19th – Rain, cold and expected gusts of 30-plus knots per hour (56 km/hr) held back some Chester Race Week fleets, but others headed out on the water to finish their races on the final day of the regatta.
After making up for Thursday’s wind-cancelled races on Friday, 14 of the 22 Bluenose-fleet boats powered through three more races to wrap up the regatta by 1:30 p.m. Crews returned to land wet but pleased with the four-days of racing action and land-based fun.
Chester Yacht Club’s Dennis Dyer, helming the Bluenose-class Wanderer (CAN B69), said skippers in the tight-knit Bluenose-class community met and agreed to start racing early on Friday and Saturday to take advantage of weather conditions and ensure they could finish all 12 scheduled races.
“We all got pretty wet today, but the courses were good and the wind was consistent. The fleet was definitely competitive and we’re seeing more young sailors joining the class and taking the lead, which bodes well for the fleet’s future. All-in-all a great experience and a really successful regatta. Now we’re going to go warm up!”
Chester-based 2016 Olympian Jacob Saunders helmed Dark ‘n’ Stormy (Chester Yacht Club) to a first-place finish overall in the Bluenose-class, with Erin Creaser (Lunenburg) on jib, and owner David Mosher (Chester) on main. This was Mosher’s second Chester Race Week and first time cracking the top 3.

For complete results visit www.chesterraceweek.com

Running an event as large as Chester Race Week 2017 is a major undertaking. Co-Chairs Cynthia Spraggs and Pat Nelder sent us this wrap-up of the event from the regatta management point of view.

We are happy to say that Chester Race Week 2017 was a very successful event. With 120 boats participating, 20 official course boats, over 1000 participants on the water, many spectator boats and spectators, with a variety of conditions from flat calm to 30 knots of breeze, CRW was amazing!

As Co-Chairs of the event for the first time we discovered that the Chester Yacht Club has long-term volunteers that take care of very important aspects of Race Week including:
• management of awards and trophies
• volunteer staffing of sales
• dedicated race registrar
• equipment manager
• sponsorship chair
• media relations

Chester Race Week 2017The Manager of the club, Kim Johnson handles the on-shore activities no matter what the weather with great attention to detail and care for her staff, while on the mooring field and on the very busy club dock, Warren Barkhouse keeps mark, tender, signal and course boats available.

Racing in Chester has changed over the years. Our professional race management team headed by Brian Todd and Daniel Conrod looked after five race courses with twelve classes racing and four sub divisions within those classes. Fifty-four of the entries were in exclusively windward leeward one-design courses; Bluenose, Sonar. IOD. Farr 30, J 24 and J70. Other one-design classes were J29, J35 and J120.

There were a great variety of fast boats, cruising boats and classic boats in the different fleets which made spectator boats enjoy the racing, our official photographer Tim Wilkes did a fantastic job of capturing the weather conditions, and the on-shore team stepped up the shore-side activities with four food trucks servicing hungry sailors, a great party on the deck on Friday afternoon and as always late night at Chester Race Week has fabulous live music all four nights.

Now that Race Week is over for the year, we think of all the great people we worked with and that we met and we tell people that CRW 2018 will take place August 15-18!

all photos Credited to: Tim Wilkes photography

Related Articles

Destinations

  • Prev
In the 1920s, a small cove in Canoe Bay was used as a shipping point and safe-haven for rum runners ...
Here’s an update from Caroline Swann with some news for the adventurous types who may be heading to ...
The New Glasgow marina is located about six miles up the East River of Pictou in the heart of the ...
The British Virgins took a huge hit last fall from Irma. Boats were stranded on the shore by the ...
Located about half way between Shediac and the Miramichi on New Brunswick’s Acadian Coast, the town ...
Suddenly the once forsaken city of Hamilton, Ontario is booming for at least two good reasons.
The Salty Dawg Sailing Association (SDSA) invites all sailors to join a cruising rally from the ...
Long popular with New England and St. John area boaters, Passamaquoddy Bay is too often overlooked ...
We did breakfast yesterday in the Greek port of Piraeus, just outside Athens:strong coffee, crisp ...
After much speculation Prince Harry finally popped the question to American actress and longtime ...

 

How to be as Polite as a Canadian at Gulf Island Marine Park Anchorages

Gulf Island Marine ParkStory and photos by Catherine Dook

One summer I sold ice cream and knick-knacks at Montague Harbour Marina. I was standing behind the counter one day, when the phone rang. “There’s a boat at anchor in the middle of the bay that’s been playing loud music for three hours,” complained an irate-sounding male voice. “Can you make them stop?”

“Um, no,” I replied. “The marina has no jurisdiction over the anchorage. Besides, my only weapon is a till.” The man hung up on me.

Now when you think about it, you can understand why the poor fellow was annoyed.

Read more about the Gulf Island Marine Park.....

 

 

 

Lifestyle

  • Prev
Don’t miss this brilliant photo double header
In honour of Launch Day, our POTW this time comes from Wendy Loat in Port Credit. This shot, taken ...
Our favorite, Man-O-War Cay, is home to the Albury Boat Building empire. They have been building ...
On the Easter Weekend, the Sidney North Saanich Yacht Club from Vancouver Island, had its first ...
We were finally able to get a SIM card and data plan on our phone Monday morning. We could now ...
It’s Friday afternoon at the Newport Yacht Club in Stoney Creek, and that can only mean one thing - ...
As things are always better in the Bahamas, especially during Canadian winters, so too are things ...
We were all set with this week’s POTW when a real stunner came in as part of a story on the Blind ...
Have your say. Send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need ...
When I was about ten years old I starting racing sailboats on Cape Cod and the sound of the wind ...
Canadian Yachting Digital May 2018

Boat Reviews

  • Prev
Tactical Custom Boats announces the sale to a North American client of a custom Tactical 77’ – Fast ...
Bruce Elliott is an inventor. And when he sold the technology he developed to build utility poles ...
One often asks of a winning achievement or a fabulous design, could it have possibly been done ...
The latest new model from Cruisers Yachts is the Cantius 42 and this yacht made its debut in the ...
The Sabre 45 Salon Express is new for 2017, making its debut at the Fort Lauderdale International ...
Jeanneau’s newest NC model is the NC 33, and it’s an exciting and innovative inboard cruiser ...
The Four Winns H290OB combines two of the most popular new big boat trends to come up with a great ...
Commodore’s Boats is a full service shipyard with over 50 years of generational history and ...

 

Dufour 412

Dufour 412By: Katherine Stone

One often asks of a winning achievement or a fabulous design, could it have possibly been done better? The engineers at Dufour Yachts and the Felci Yachts Design group asked that question and listened carefully to suggestions from owners of the earlier, award-winning Dufour 410- one of Dufour’s most successful 12-metre boats. Not only did Dufour make the 412 more attractive and modern, but alsoincorporated amenities that are usually only reserved for larger boats.

We sailed the boat on a gusty, chilly, late autumn day out of Whitby, Ontario, on Lake Ontario, and she handled very well in 20 knotbreezes and three- to four-foot swells.

Read more about the Dufour 412.....

 

 

DIY & How to

  • Prev
Pyrotechnic distress flares have been around for decades, while electronic strobe distress flares ...
In the early spring, just after launch, with the hustle and bustle of engine checks, antifouling, ...
All engines, including marine engines (inboards, outboards and stern drives) have many moving parts ...
Most of us don’t give a second thought to our sacrificial anodes – those curious knobs of raw metal ...
I once heard an argument at a yacht club. Two old salts, patiently itching to let go lines and ...
In this time of boat show afterglow, many boaters are counting the days until launch. 
This one-day course consists of both theory and practical demonstration sessions, is designed to ...
Water has a funny way of making its way into a boat: through through-hulls, stuffing boxes, leaks, ...
If you walk the aisles at a boat show, visit a marine store, or stop in at a repair shop, you’ll ...
 Since the initial article of this column we have identified a wide range of apps and ...

 

Pyrotechnic Distress Flares vs. Electronic Distress Strobes

Pyrotechnic Distress Flares vs. Electronic Distress StrobesBy Andy Adams

Pyrotechnic distress flares have been around for decades, while electronic strobe distress flares have only been introduced in the last couple of years - and they aren't Canadian Coast Guard approved for use in Canada, at least not yet.

But which one is best? And the more important question is: When should you signal for help?

When the authorities do a vessel inspection on the water, they are looking for equipment that is in compliance with the regulations such as lifejackets, bailing buckets, sound signaling devices, and so on.

Read more about Pyrotechnic Distress Flares vs. Electronic Distress Strobes...

 

  

Marine Products

  • Prev
Industry Firsts Include Direct Injection and Integrated Electric Steering System
Verviers, Belgium, 18 May 2018 — Mercury Marine, the world leader in marine propulsion technology, ...
Again, we return to the beginning. We started this column with a look at marine navigation for ...
Ga-Oh (spirit of the winds in Algonquin) creates bags and other items from re-purposed sails.
The 2018 Northwest Boat Travel Guide just arrived. This time of the year is the perfect time for ...
We are all looking to gain a little more time these days, and technology is often the route we ...
While they are no longer a part of the CPS Flare Program, Fogh Boat Supplies and Fogh Marine, both ...
We have all had the experience of heading down below on a nice boat only to encounter an unpleasant ...
Starting from the top. If you partake in any winter activities, you have probably heard that your ...
Last year when this column launched a good deal of time was spent understanding global satellite ...