May 9, 2019

Long WeekendAh, long weekends. There are only four during the summer so each one is cherished by Canadians but this one coming up carries special significance for boaters and cottagers. (There are few things we Canadians cherish more than our long weekends. One such long weekend carries special significance for boaters and cottagers.) It’s the May 24th Victoria Day long weekend, which is considered by most as the unofficial start of summer! It’s the weekend where the “Honey Do” List takes a back seat to opening up the cottage, launching the boat and hauling out the water toys.

Historically, though, this weekend has also been one that generates more than its fair share of boating-related incidents and fatalities. It’s for this reason that May 18th-24th is Safe Boating Awareness Week for 2019. The goal is to remind those who ply our Canadian waterways to boat safely and responsibly, now at the beginning of boating season.

There are a number of factors that together constitute a dangerous mix when on the water at any time, but especially during long weekends; when the sheer number of boats on the lake which often outnumber those of a normal weekend by a factor of 10! Even on relatively calm days, the converging wakes generated by the increased traffic from sport boats to large cruisers can easily capsize smaller fishing boats, canoes and kayaks.

While air temperatures over the Victoria Day long weekend can often be quite balmy, boaters need to remember that the temperature of the water has only risen a handful of degrees since the ice receded. The cold shock can be deadly should someone fall overboard or their boat capsizes and sinks. A good idea to guard against this possibility is to either wear or pack thermal protective clothing to slow the onset of hypothermia until help arrives. This, of course, is in addition to wearing a PFD which will also provide some thermal protection. Having the means to call for help, should it be required, either by marine radio or cell phone (service dependent) is a must.

Make sure to have sufficient personal floatation devices (PFDs) on board for everyone. Check them for proper fit as well as for broken zippers or buckles, split seams or excessive wear. Should any of these be apparent, the PFD must be replaced.

However the greatest contributor to tragedies on long holiday weekends can be the celebratory consumption of alcohol that accompanies the euphoria of leaving the rat race behind, even for a few days. In fact, alcohol accounts for approximately 40% of all boating-related incidents and fatalities.

Boating sober is an especially important message that boaters need to heed. Alcohol, recreational drugs or prescriptions narcotics should never be consumed either in advance or while boating.

It’s not difficult to have an enjoyable and safe start to your summer. By behaving responsibly on the water, ensuring you have the proper safety equipment aboard and limiting your alcohol consumption to after your arrive back at the dock, you can truly enjoy this upcoming holiday weekend.

To learn more, visit www.csbc.ca for great tips on how to have a safe season on the water.

Valvetech Bridgewater MarinaFor many years now, we have used gasoline in our cars and trucks that contains some amount of ethanol, a form of alcohol, and just as a few drops of water combine almost instantly in your Scotch, moisture from the atmosphere can combine with the ethanol in the gasoline that is in your boat’s fuel tank.

Your motor vehicle has a sealed fuel system to control evaporative losses that are a source of air pollution. Fuel is moved into the engine under pressure and any drips that might escape, drop onto the pavement. The engine is open to the pavement below. In an inboard boat, the hull is below the engine and any drips will collect in the bilge with potentially explosive consequences. 

Read more about gasoline containing ethanol......

 

  

Grand Banks 60 SkyloungeThe Canadian market has always been a tough nut for yacht designers to figure out. Summer days get really hot; other days are downright cold. There is always the chance things could change in the blink of an eye and let’s be honest, who among us hasn’t stepped off the boat wearing shorts, flip flops and a warm jacket? Canadian yachting has always been a world of contradictions, which is why designing cruising yachts for this market has never been easy. It’s not like Florida or the Med, where weather is dependable throughout the year.

 

 

Read more about the Grand Banks 60 Skylounge............

 

ILCA DinghyAustin, Texas, USA (25 April 2019) – In the wake of last month’s termination of its contract with its European builder, the International Laser Class Association (ILCA) announced today that, from 25 April 2019, all new, class-approved boats will be sold and raced under the “ILCA Dinghy” name. This change will have no impact on existing ILCA-authorized boats and equipment, which will be able to race alongside ILCA Dinghies in all class sanctioned events.


“It’s a big change for a racing class that hasn’t seen anything like this in our almost 50- year history,” said Class President Tracy Usher.

Read More about the ILCA Dinghy............


The DocksBy Katherine Stone

Docks are well-lit and wide to accommodate dock carts.

Steeped in tradition that goes back to one of the oldest towns in Canada west of Quebec City, is Penetanguishene. This bilingual community of 9,000 is located in the middle of Huronia on the southeasterly tip of Georgian Bay in Simcoe Country, Ontario. The name is believed to have been derived from Algonquin (also believed to have come from the Wendat, Abenaki and Ojibwe tribes) meaning “place of the white rolling sands”. 

Read more about the Hindson Marina..........