July 26, 2018

80thIn the spring edition of the 1998 Port Hole, Brentwood Bay Squadron Commander Len Fallon proclaimed, “CPS will be there to meet the challenge of change!” Thanks Len. 

CPS – now CPS-ECP - has done just that. It has met those early challenges as well as the many challenges that have come since. For example; On April 3, 1998 CPS-ECP learned that mandatory operator proficiency requirements were to be required for power boats. (Note: Pleasure Craft Operator Cards were required as of April 1 1999 for anyone wishing to operate power -driven boat. Also note: There were certain age and horse-power restrictions for youths.) Not sure if there is a correlation between proficiency requirements and membership but in the same year our organization’s membership jumped by more than a thousand new members. In terms of challenges accommodating a membership surge is a good one to have.

Hard to believe but in the fall of the same year it was reported that boaters wanted shorter courses so Boating One and Boating Two were developed. Students who passed Boating One were awarded Operator Proficiency and a CPS Associate Membership. In the spring of the following year our Education Department’s safe boating courses were accredited by the Canadian Coast Guard. Another challenge successfully met. For the record, CPS-ECP did not lower its safe boating teaching standards , we simply met the mandatory requirements, filled the new niche with many squadrons working to successfully take advantage of the opportunity.

Moving towards the millennium and with regards to teaching boat operator proficiency as well as meeting competitive challenges from other sources a line from Monty Python seems most appropriate “ We’re not dead yet!” Speaking of moving into the millennium, it would be a gross oversight not to mention that John Gullick became our Deputy Executive Director in 1998.

In 1999 P/C/C Dave Durward was clear when wrote that CPS-ECP students were registering for CPS-ECP’s courses largely because of our organization’s reputation for teaching safe boating. Mr. Durward was also prophetic when he concluded, “ – we (CPS-ECP) have to change the way we do things ….” Mr. Durward’s word provide a good perspective when deciding how best to meet any challenge.

Again speaking of challenges, one other notable quote from P/C/C Durward, “Here’s a challenge. Think back on why you joined CPS. Is the reason still valid? Has your vision of what we do and what we represent dulled? Have you done much for your squadron lately?”

In 2000 at the start of a new millennium CPS-ECP received a request for its Boat Pro course to be translated into Mandarin. In the same year discussion about changing CPS-ECP in order to be more attractive to younger members became common place. CPS-ECP’s traditional-style of uniform became a topic for change. This was also the year were many began to embrace computer technology in every aspect of their lives – including boating. It was increasingly faster and easier to look something on a computer than in a book.

Certainly, the challenges presented by computer technology – soon to be better known as digital technology – have been and remain pervasive. However, CPS-ECP’s excellent reputation as a very well respected boating organization is thanks to its volunteers who have worked and are still working to promote CPS-ECP. To fully meet the digital challenge what is still needed is for squadrons to continue to reach out to their local boating communities and all of the fun boating can be along with talking about boating safety and fly the CPS-ECP flag.

Change and challenge or as interpreted by CPS-ECP members reads as understood and accepted. P/C/C Howard Peck wrote “Innovation. Change. Challenge. Three brief words, yet they totally describe CPS in 2001 and beyond.” Mr. Peck was spot-on. Please do yourself a favor re-read Mr. Peck’s article in the 2001 Summer edition of Port Hole magazine. Another challenge for CPS-ECP members came from P/C/C Tony Gardiner who often expounded on the value CPS-ECP delivered to Canadian boaters– he was not the only member to do so. Mr. Gardiner had a challenge of his own for our organization, “….we must address new markets and respond to the training requirements for today’s and tomorrow’s boater.” Mr. Gardiner was equally insistent CPS-ECP continue to play “a major role in educating, instructing skills on the water and rescuing boaters in trouble.” One more thing, about Mr. Gardiner’s challenge, he identified P/C/C Serge St.Martin as having d developed new and innovative marketing and public relations programmes when he was the NAO. Well done Serge! But now fifteen years later it’s another member’s turn to meet that same challenge only this time dealing with the digital technology and social media. Any takers?

By Don Macintosh

Valvetech Bridgewater MarinaFor many years now, we have used gasoline in our cars and trucks that contains some amount of ethanol, a form of alcohol, and just as a few drops of water combine almost instantly in your Scotch, moisture from the atmosphere can combine with the ethanol in the gasoline that is in your boat’s fuel tank.

Your motor vehicle has a sealed fuel system to control evaporative losses that are a source of air pollution. Fuel is moved into the engine under pressure and any drips that might escape, drop onto the pavement. The engine is open to the pavement below. In an inboard boat, the hull is below the engine and any drips will collect in the bilge with potentially explosive consequences. 

Read more about gasoline containing ethanol......

 

  

Four WInns HD 180By Andy Adams

The Four Winns HD 180 is the kind of family boat I love to drive and enjoy. It’s very approachable, even for less experienced drivers and the accommodations and scale are like a comfortable family car or SUV. It all feels familiar and part of that is the Volvo Penta V6 200 SX stern drive. The engine is inboard; built into the boat and unobtrusive in use.

That is unless you shove the throttles open. Then the performance side of the Volvo Penta V6 200 appears with instant throttle response, partly a result of the variable valve timing and partly because of the direct injection system. 

Read more about the Four WInns HD 180.......

 

ILCA DinghyAustin, Texas, USA (25 April 2019) – In the wake of last month’s termination of its contract with its European builder, the International Laser Class Association (ILCA) announced today that, from 25 April 2019, all new, class-approved boats will be sold and raced under the “ILCA Dinghy” name. This change will have no impact on existing ILCA-authorized boats and equipment, which will be able to race alongside ILCA Dinghies in all class sanctioned events.


“It’s a big change for a racing class that hasn’t seen anything like this in our almost 50- year history,” said Class President Tracy Usher.

Read More about the ILCA Dinghy............


The DocksBy Katherine Stone

Docks are well-lit and wide to accommodate dock carts.

Steeped in tradition that goes back to one of the oldest towns in Canada west of Quebec City, is Penetanguishene. This bilingual community of 9,000 is located in the middle of Huronia on the southeasterly tip of Georgian Bay in Simcoe Country, Ontario. The name is believed to have been derived from Algonquin (also believed to have come from the Wendat, Abenaki and Ojibwe tribes) meaning “place of the white rolling sands”. 

Read more about the Hindson Marina..........