May 24, 2018

VesselI have been asked if I expect any changes to the boating Safety Regulations and I recently received notice of a few proposed changes to Transport Canada’s Small Vessel Regulations that will have an effect on recreational boaters across the country and will probably be introduced by this summer.

Stand up Paddle Boards will now be added to the list of Recreational Vessels and will be subject to the same safety equipment requirements as Paddleboards, Watercycles, Sealed-Hull and Sit-On-Top Kayaks.

They will be required to carry:

• One (1) lifejacket or PFD for each person on board*
• A buoyant heaving line of at least 15 meters in length,
• A sound signaling device
• and a watertight flashlight or navigation lights if the vessel is used after sunset or before sunrise.

*If everyone on board is wearing a lifejacket or PFD of appropriate size they are only required to carry a sound signaling device (whistle attached to their PFD) and a watertight flashlight if the vessel is used after sunset or before sunrise.

The obvious aim of this * acceptation is to have all those using these types of vessels wear their lifejackets or PFDs.

The other change that will affect safety equipment requirements relates to the number of required flares. Here is a list by vessel length of the current and coming changes:

Vessels no more than 6 meters in length:

• Current: Three flares other than smoke signals.
• •New: Three flares not more than one of which is a smoke signal.

Vessels more than 6 meters up to not more than 9 meters in length:

• Current: Six flares other than smoke signals.
• New: Six flares, not more than two of which are smoke signals. *Exception: At least three flares, not more than one of which is a smoke signal if there is also a means of two way electronic communications on board.

Vessels more than 9 meters in length:

• Current: Twelve flares, not more than six of which are smoke signals.
• New: No change.*Exception: At least six flares, not more than two of which is a smoke signal if there is also a means of two way electronic communications on board.

Human Powered Craft more than 6 meters:

• Current: Six flares other than smoke signals.
• New: Six flares, not more than two of which are smoke signals. *Exception; At least three flares, not more than one of which is a smoke signal if there is also a means of two way electronic communications on board.

Personal Watercraft:

• Three flares other than smoke signals.
• Three flares, not more than one of which is a smoke signal.

Note: Flares are not required for a vessel that is operating on a river, canal or lake on which it can be no more than 1 nautical mile (1.85 Km) from shore or has no sleeping quarters and is engaged in official competition or pin preparation for an official competition.

There is also a minor change to the Pleasure Craft License requirement. This is the license for the boat, not the operator.

The amendment would clarify that an update to a license would not extend the expiry date of a Pleasure Craft License by an additional 10 years.

On the renewal of Pleasure Craft Licenses, which are currently good for 10 years and for which there is currently no charge to renew the license, I strongly suspect that within the next few years there will a change to a 3 to 5 year renewal period and a renewal fee will be introduced so users will help to pay for the vessel licensing program.

John Gullick

Manager of Government and Special Programmes


Mackinaw IslandA favourite destination for many boaters and tourists alike is the lovely Mackinaw Island. Sitting in Lake Huron on the eastern end of the Straits of Mackinac in the state of Michigan, it covers almost ten kilometres, of which 80% is park land. It was a sacred place of the Anishinaabe and home of the Gitche Manitou (Great Spirit) some 700 years prior to the arrival of the first Europeans.

According to legend, the Island was created by the Great Hare, Michabou, and was the first land to appear after the recession of the Great Flood.

Read more about the Mackinaw Island...

 


Jeanneau NC 1095Andy Adams

The reinvention of the family cabin cruiser

We will probably look back on 2018 and 2019 as the years when power boats were reinvented by the combined forces of a booming U.S. economy and the wide-spread development and introduction of so many amazing new outboard engines. The result has been the development of many remarkable new designs!

One of the most inventive designers and builders is Jeanneau, and the NC 1095 is their new flagship outboard cruiser by Centkowski & Denert Design.

 

Read more about the Jeanneau NC 1095...

Lagoon 46Lagoon has been building catamarans for too long to make a false move. That’s why when the management felt that their tried-and-true 450 model, long a cruising favourite and winner of transatlantic events such as the ARC, was getting near retirement age, they went back to a team that has designed many successful models for them: Nauta Design for interiors and VPLP design with Patrick le Quément for naval architecture and exteriors.

We spoke with Nauta Design’s Massimo Gino about his work with Lagoon.

“Along with the many custom superyacht projects we do, we have been collaborating with Lagoon since 2009.

Read More about the Lagoon 46...

Ground Bus BarGrounding is always an interesting idea when on a boat. Can a boat be ‘grounded’ when it’s in the water?


Electrical ground is a term used to describe the reference point in an electrical circuit from which voltage is measured, a common return path for electric current, or a direct physical connection to the earth.

Connection to ground is also important in order to trigger protective mechanisms in the event of failure of internal insulation, and also limits the build-up of static electricity.

Read More about Electrical Installations Basics...