Oct 10, 2019

Lock Wall in CampbellfordMarabob and Adamant 1 spending the night on the lock wall in Campbellford.

We crossed Lake Ontario from Oswego with a minimum of fuss and did a little happy dance when we crossed the border into Canada…that little dotted line on the chart. “Take down the US flag, put up the quarantine flag and lets head for Waupoos Island” shouts the captain (me)!

We pulled up to the gas dock at the marina, only to find it was mostly underwater. Hmmm, where to put fenders. The attendant brought me a small stepladder so I could get off the boat, use the payphone and call Customs and Immigration. Have you ever seen any of the Indiana Jones movies, where he pushes aside a thick curtain of cobwebs to move forward? Well, this should have been my first clue that this call could have been made from my cell phone right on the boat. I’m a slow learner! I fought my way to the phone, cleared a space on top for documents and found the receiver…yuk!

Part way through my call, the marina operator decided he needed to learn how to operate his new forklift. Right beside the phone booth! He got it turned around and promptly got the raised forks caught in the tree that overhangs the phone booth. I am talking to the agent and watching the forks move the branches down on top of the booth. Finally she asked what the racket was and I explained the guy was trying to crush the ancient phone booth with me in it. We ended the call quickly, I got my check in number, then she told me to “move it”. I moved it back through the hole in the cobwebs and away from the mad forklift operator!!

Kirkfield LiftlockKirkfield Lift Lock is the start of the down-bound locks.

We arrived in Trenton the next afternoon anxious to start the Trent Severn Waterway, the last link to home. As it turned out, Lock 3 was down for repairs and we had to wait four days to get in. We could not stay at the upbound blue line as the whole cement dock was underwater. We stayed at Trent Port Marina, the most beautiful marina we have ever met.

Eventually we were able to head out and had Marabob, a Pilgrim 40 trawler as our buddy boat. The water was running fast and high in the river and getting into each lock meant aiming for the rapids and having the current push you into the lock approach. It was intimidating and most locks throughout the system were the same.

Spaghetti DinnerSpaghetti dinner aboard Adamant 1 with our crew who came along for the second half of the Waterway. Note the yellow sticker on the curtain

Our Trent Severn Waterway is much prettier than the Erie Canal and the scenery along the way was, in a lot of places, spectacular. Most days were calm and sunny. We picked up our friends Kent and Linda in Campbellford. They had never done the Trent Severn, were excited to be getting the chance to do it and we were glad for the extra help with locks and navigating.

Don't Veer Off Track

 

 

 

Thick weeds made it important not to veer off of the track left by previous boats.

The only challenge to the navigation was the weed growth. It was prudent to follow the narrow path left for us by previous boats, especially boats with BIG propellers who chew up the weeds. We got off the channel a bit in Rice Lake and I am surprised that we aren’t still there trying to get through. The weeds were almost impenetrable. It took 15 minutes to get untangled and back in the main channel. Thankfully Marabob held fast, as buddy boats do, ready to come in and get us.

There are places between Balsam Lake and Kirkfield where the canal is only wide enough for one boat. A mile in, despite calling a security, we met two large cruisers. We passed each other only a foot apart. Yikes! Just before Kirkfield, there is no room for passing. I called a security twice with no response, only to have to back out of the canal when a trimaran came down at us. I finally called the lock and asked if they had let anyone else into the canal since the trimaran and they said they would hold up locking anyone else until we arrived. Nice guys those lockmasters!

On The Rail CarAdamant 1 suspended on the rail car.

After that area, the scenery is lovely…small waterfalls, beautiful cottages and loads of flowers everywhere. Lake Simcoe was flat calm so the crossing was an easy one. We spent two days in Orillia at another spectacular marina as friends from back home wanted to take us to lunch and be the first ones to welcome us back. So nice!! We left Orillia and entered the canal at Washago. There is a train bridge just inside and the clearance is usually 15’, but with the river running high we decided to wait until the train went by and the bridge opened for us. It didn’t open! A fellow on the bridge climbed down to the support pillar, told us to go slow and eyeballed us through. Our temporary antenna hit all the beams and the head of our mast at the stern missed by inches. None of us had any fingernails left!

On Big Chute Marine RailwayAdamant 1 on the rail car headed overland at Big Chute Marine Railway.

The rest of the trip was beautiful. What a wonderful area we live in. Our trip overland on the marine railway was a smooth one. As a side note, we had been experiencing a vibration in the boat for some time and had not been able to get in the water to check if we had something wrapped around the prop. When we were on the railcar, one of the attendants took a knife and went under the boat. He came up with a 10’ piece of badly twisted rope. Who knows where we picked that up. And there was no more vibration!

Rope Stuck In Our Propeller

 

 

 

 

This is the rope the attendant at the railway found on our propeller!

We spent Friday evening at the lock in Port Severn. We were only 15 miles from home but we had told everyone we would be in at noon on Saturday. Everyone showed up at noon to welcome us home, except we got there at 10:30 and our son and grandson were the only ones there at that time! It didn’t matter. We had champagne ready and we toasted to a successful trip. We did 8200 nautical miles, saw a lot of country you can only see by being on the water, had some wild adventures and met so many wonderful people, some of whom will be life-long friends. We came back in one piece, with the addition of a couple of new ones. (If you have been following this blog you will know which ones.)

Almost HomeA familiar site....almost home.

In one of the pics posted you will see a bright yellow button pinned to the curtain above the table. It reads “I’ve survived damn near everything.” I am going to frame that thing!!

Next issue, CYOB will present a highlight reel of photos Lynn took along the Trent-Severn. Great shots - you won’t want to miss them!

Lynn Lortie- Longtime CY staffer Lynn Lortie and her husband Pat left Midland the summer of 2016 to make their way into the Great Loop and head out on a three year sailing odyssey. Follow their progress right here in CYOB.

Related Articles

DIY & How to

  • Prev
This bag does more than hold your anchor and rode in one tidy little pile. After you’ve anchored ...
Purchase your copy of the BRAND NEW Ports Georgian Bay 2020 Edition at the Toronto International ...
The boat was put on the hard for this winter and were going to follow along with Graham as he ...
In this part, we’ll delve deeper into the other parts of the boat found below the water line: the ...
I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve told my children to wash their hands. I remind them ...
The new editions of PORTS Cruising Guides, from the publishers of Canadian Yachting will be ...
As the seasons change and we move from warm summer into cooler fall, many fanatic boaters ...
On the Friday before a weekend with a gorgeous forecast, I heard on the news that a boat had ...
A reader suggested we take a look at anchors. Anchoring seems simple enough. A weighted hook with a ...
If you’ve spent any time in a boat yard during spring commissioning season, you won’t find it out ...

Tight FitA new shrink-wrap promises more environmentally conscious

In Nov 2019, I was fortunate enough to attend the Boating Ontario conference in Niagara Falls ON. This conference is geared to members and suppliers of the marine industry particularly marina operations. One of the suppliers was Layfield Geosynthetics, offering a new shrink-wrap film called ‘Bioflex MarineShrink’. The Layfield rep that I spoke with described the new product as a more environmentally conscious option (more on what this means, below).

Read more about Shrink Wrap........................

 

  

Boat Reviews

  • Prev
With a philosophy of quality and 'doing things right Ranger Tugs launches the all new R-25 at the ...
The new Beneteau Swift Trawler 41 renews the spirit of the practical seaworthy cruiser. The ...
The Canadian Yachting test crew last week had the opportunity to run the Bavaria S36 HT at St ...
ILCA is seeking new builders to complement its existing network of manufacturers, the International ...
Nelson Gilbert (1854-1921) began building canoes in Brockville in the 1890s, a time when the sport ...
I have heard a lot of talk lately about trends in yacht clubs where senior membership is getting ...
To get you in the mood for cruising the Boat Show then launching in spring, here’s a boat that ...
Quite simply, the styles of boats have changed. Where in past years a buyer might have been looking ...
At the boat shows, the Ranger Tugs’ classic tugboat lines always grab the crowds, with the wives ...
Sometimes a great idea requires an encore, and French yacht builder Jeanneau got that with the ...

Pursuit DC 235A Great Boat for Canada and Mom Approved Too!

By Jill Snider and Andy Adams

Coming from two different directions, Jill Snider and I met up at Crates Lake Country Boats in Orillia, Ontario to run and review a new Pursuit DC 235, a deep vee dual console boat that is an offshore inspired bow rider with strong fishing overtones and a wide range of family features.

It’s what I would call a handsome, classically styled boat that I suspect will still look fresh many years into the future. Jill had a different take on it.

 

Read more about the Pursuit DC 235.....................

Destinations

  • Prev
Boom & Batten Restaurant is suspended over the water adjacent to the Songhees Walkway and ...
Provincial Boat Havens are those special places to drop anchor in British Columbia’s West Coast and ...
NW Explorations, a Bellingham, Washington-based yacht charter, brokerage, and marine services ...
If you haven’t cruised the Rideau Canal before, you have missed a special treat and even if you ...
At the 2019 Vancouver International Boat Show I had the pleasure of meeting up with Allyson and ...
Following the harsh impact of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, The British Virgin Islands is making an ...
For the adventurous boater Bunsby Marine Provincial Park is a special place, situated due south of ...
There is good anchoring in Cowichan Bay and nearby, and salt water enough to make any boater happy. ...
We’re gliding through green-blue waters, colours so vivid and bright they hurt your eyes. We’re set ...
The Halifax waterfront has been attracting more and more large yachts in recent years. However, a ...

Moorings In BrazilWith an increasing amount of interest in South America as a charter destination, The Moorings has responded with a new base in Paraty, Brazil. Surrounded by towering jungles plummeting into the waters of Baia Carioca, this charter cruising region features bays peppered with islands and world-famous beaches.

Centrally located between Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, Paraty (pronounced “Para-chee”) holds the key to many natural wonders you can only discover by boat.

Read more about Moorings' Brazil Charters......................

 

Marine Products

  • Prev
It is not often I get to drive the newer model of something I own. Most of the time the model I own ...
Good news cruisers, it’s coming in early Summer 2020 – PORTS Rideau Canal and Lower Ottawa River ...
Few things are as frustrating to a boat owner as being becalmed or running out of fuel—or both. If ...
Every cruiser in the region has used it for years, but now there’s a brand new edition of the ...
When you visit the Toronto Boat Show, come to the Canadian Yachting booth (#1741), trial a pair of ...
With the Davis Scrubbis Underwater Hull Cleaning Kit it's easy to rid a boat of algae, grass, and ...
There is nothing worse for me to have too many keys on your key chain. Even if I move a few to ...
One of the most important boat-ownership tasks is cleaning the bilge. Not only does it reduce ...
Most dock boxes aren't sturdy enough to sit on. Nor are they too comfortable. Finally! - the ...
Too hot to bake? No oven onboard anyway? Try these no-bake shipboard treats. (Yes, we know they’re ...