Mar 7, 2017

Kaila At DockLast issue we pondered who is buying sailboats – powerboats are selling briskly at the boat shows, but sail isn’t soaring at those same shows. Nonetheless, slips are full, and it would appear that sailing is healthy. What’s up?

Here’s what you told us:


I like both


I like both power and sail and perceive that there are two separate camps here. 

Powerboats - bought by people with little experience because there is far less to think of before you get away from the dock - My thinking is poorly phrased but it is the easiest access to boating for a newcomer. Older owners do not have to do the physical ability expected with sailing.

Sailing - Is it the more environmentally concerned individuals that do not want to pollute the atmosphere? Or does the owner want a more sedate mode of boating? Sailing also requires a larger envelope of skills than a powerboat.

Ion Barnes
Shawnigan Lake BC



Kaila June 19A lovely surprise

I should have seen it coming, but I didn’t.

I had a powerboat, although my roots are in sailing. My Formula 330SS was a quiet, yet go fast performance cruiser on Georgian Bay – a powerboat mecca! I wanted to see all 30,000 Islands in just a few years – and I did. And Georgian Bay – of any places on the Great Lakes - seems to be a powerboat paradise.

The scenery and boating was fabulous – but power boating is far different than sailing (sorry guys but anyone can turn a key and push a throttle).

And I hungered to get back to my roots. I belonged to the best club on Lake Ontario, ABYC, where there are no privileged airs and I wanted to go ‘home’. So I listed my boat and started looking – and looking.

Used or new? Big question – easily resolved by price. I set a price and a length – 35’ to 45’. Easy, right? Not so much! Too old, too much work, great boat, too much money....

It turned into a full time quest. I was driving my broker crazy.

In the middle of this my father passed on to meet my mom in heaven... So I took a break, then for the second time I listed my powerboat with a firm resolve to get back to my roots.

January 2016, I asked a close friend to come to the boat show with me. She knew I has been looking and participating what I call ‘boat porn’ online for a few months looking at boat videos, racing, designs, manufacturers, tech advancements and so much more.

Kaila New

She asked the obvious question; “Are you going to buy anything?” “No” I said, “not even thinking about it.”

She agreed – but only if I bought her a hot dog.

We made our way through the endless displays of power craft to the ‘Sailfest’ where I encountered my broker. He said; “We sold your boat!”. After I cast a disbelieving eye in his direction, I was told it was true. Next question; “Do you want to buy one of these?” I looked around and he was gesturing at a brand that did not resonate. “No thank you” I said. “But if you have anything designed by Umberto Felci I would.”

The answer came as I was walking away... “We just landed the Dufour dealership in Ontario”! (designed by aforementioned architect)...

Uh oh...

The Dufour 382. 2016 Boat of the Year. Perfect in every way. Fast. Beautiful. Technologically advanced. Brand spanking new. $200,000 over budget.

1 1/2 hours later.... The most expensive hot dog ever.

I should have seen it coming... But I guess I was ready.

Rob Wyers/Kaila

P.S. In honour of my parents’ boats at ABYC, I named her Kaila. Thanks, Mom and Dad.


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