Jan 10, 2016

Hello Photo of the Week enthusiasts and welcome to a superb album to kick off 2017.

This whole batch comes from Frank and Sharon Edison. When I looked at them, I felt like I’d been on a cruise all ‘round The Rock. Here’s Frank’s introduction:

 

We spent the summer of 2016 cruising northern Newfoundland and southern Labrador. Although every mile and every port had their charms we recall most often three locations; Great Harbour Deep, Henley Harbour and Battle Harbour.

Great Harbour Deep was a fishing community on the Great Northern Peninsula of NL. It was abandoned in 2002 and the inhabitants relocated to other communities that had road access and therefore necessary facilities like schools and medical were readily available. The port no longer has liviers (NL term for people who live primarily in the area) yet a few people maintain the old houses and out buildings for use in the summer. There is also an outfitter with a lodge who caters to snowmobilers in the winter.

Henley Harbour on the south coast of Labrador is another abandoned community. The people were relocated in the early ‘70s but many kept their houses as cabins and continued to fish from there.

Bergy Bits

 Cruising through the bergy field to gather a bit for my rum. These are the most dangerous obstacles for a fiberglass boat because they are hard to see. We usually steered well clear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Battle Harbour
Battle Harbour, Labrador. Once considered the capitol of Labrador as it was a thriving fishing community and boasted having one of the first hospitals in NL, established by Dr Wilfred Grenfell

 

Great Harbour
Great Harbour Deep. We are tied alongside a fishing boat. This was our usual practice when possible so we did not have to ride the tide on the rough wharves. Bring a fender board! Ours got a great work out.

 

 

 

 

 

Henley Harbour

 

Henley Harbour. We were unsure if we could get alongside or not but found the wharf in fair shape and lots of water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharon And Frank

Sharon and me at the high point on Stage Island.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ReportHenley Harbour. As I rummaged through the old houses I found so much ‘neat’ stuff. This is the lighthouse report from 1949. Note the name Stone at the bottom. Almost everyone who lived in the community was related.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ice BergSo many bergs that the camera was always at the ready. Every angle and change in the light made for a completely different picture. Unfortunately it is difficult to get a feel for the size as this one had to be at least 100 ft high.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submit yours!!
The Photo of the Week feature has turned out to be a goldmine. The shots above were submitted a couple of weeks ago. Now we’d love to get yours. Please.
Here are the rules – they must be taken from or near a boat. They must be your shots and free from copyright. Most importantly, they must be wonderful. Send the to us via This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and put Photo in the subject line.

Cape Breton – My Personal Playground

Cape Breton - St Peters MarinaBy Elizabeth Ann Kerr

A year ago, it’s quite possible that if someone gave me an outline of Canada and asked me to point to Cape Breton Island, I would have failed, at least on my first attempt. Now, its shape, topography and waypoint remain indelibly emblazoned on my heart.

It is also quite possible that Celtic Colours – an annual gathering of more than 200 local and internationally renowned musicians, performing 49 concerts in 32communities– helped to kick start Cape Breton’s tourism industry 20 years ago.

Read more of Cape Breton.....

 

 

Armdale Yacht ClubBy Katherine Stone

You can’t possibly pack in more national history associated with a yacht club than what you can find on Deadman’s Island in Nova Scotia. This is what Halloween legends were made of, as it was not uncommon once upon a time, to have an arm appear out of the ground in winter with the remainder of the poor skeleton not being reunited with its appendage until the spring thaw.

Many years after the Micmacs discovered Melville Island, the spot they called “end of the water,” the site was used for storehouses and then was purchased by the British, where a prisoner-of-war camp was built to house captives in the Napoleonic Wars and then later during the War of 1812.

Read more about Armdale Yacht Club...

 

Vanquish 24 RunaboutBy Andy Adams

Big, elegant, and capable

Families with young people who are seriously into waterskiing or wake boarding face a difficult choice: Buy a dedicated tow sports boat and make the kids happy or buy a more traditional family boat and make everyone comfortable.

In our opinion, the Vanquish 24 Runabout offers up a big, elegant, and capable solution that could make everybody happy. This is not a cheap solution, but it's an impressive one. Last August, we traveled to Gravenhurst, Ontario, and got our first look at the Vanquish 24 Runabout, tied up at Muskoka Wharf Marine. One glance told us this was a special boat.

Read More of the Vanquish 24 Review.....

Seamasters Inflatables

Always a major exhibitor at the Halifax International Boat Show, Seamaster’s sales manager Dave Trott tells us they will have several news products on display including the new Stingray 206cc and the 186cc.

Seamaster Services of Dartmouth is a diversified company with roots in the marine safety business. Over the years they have expanded from liferafts to inflatable boats, as a Zodiac dealers, and now sell and service an extensive line of fibreglass and inflatable boats including Grady-White and Stingray.

Read more about Seamasters....