July 25, 2017

Martins FireballMartin’s boat, #1205, on a shake-down cruise on the Salish Sea.

Martin Herbert of the Saltspring Island Sailing Club shares his memories as he prepares for the FireBall Dinghy Regatta, Canadian National Championship.

“In 1962 English designer Peter Milne drew up the plans for the Fireball Dinghy and the prototype was featured in Yachts and Yachting Magazine. My Father, Alf Herbert, saw the pictures of it planning along at speed and ordered plans, building the first two Fireballs to sail in Canada. In 1965 My brother, Graham Herbert won the first Canadian National Championships with me as crew. The next year my Father, Brother and I built two more boats out of better materials and in 1967 I won the Nationals with my brother as crew. Fifty years later I learned that the Nationals were being held in Cowichan Bay, a mere 20-mile sail from my home club on Saltspring Island. I decided to dig the boat out of storage, refinish her and sail her to the regatta. The best sailor in our club, Greg Slakov, immediately signed up as crew and we have been putting ourselves and the boat through the paces for four weeks. Since moving to Saltspring ten years ago I have been sailing the venerable Flying Fifteen Keelboat so it was a learning curve to step back into a dinghy. I had forgotten how exciting the Fireball is to sail. The regatta starts on July 23rd and our sail to the event is on the 22nd.”

Fireball InfallableThe Fireball Dingy Canadian Championship has three days of racing on the West Coast in Cowichan Bay. The regatta will be based at the Cowichan Tribes’ Boathouse area at the east end of Cowichan Bay village, at the end of Botwood lane. Sailing will take place in Cowichan Bay and the entrances thereof.

Race coordinator Rob Thompson is still building boats, most recently of Kevlar, foam core, and epoxy. His newest boat is 15098, “Infallible”


http://www.fireball-international.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-Fireball-Canadian-Championship.pdf

Grenada: It was all so inviting...

The Large Island of Grenada

By Katherine Stone

Anytime a Canadian is asked to travel south in the beginning of our spring, which this year was far from inviting, is a dream worth living. The thought of a sailing adventure, tropical breezes, the smell of spices and the warmth of the sun was too much – we HAD to go! The first thing we did was to dig out the copy of Ann Vanderhoof’s book, The Spice Necklace, we had acquired several years ago and to re-read the seven chapters of their adventures in Grenada. Not only should this be your required reading, but the book is loaded with scrumptious Caribbean recipes that are a must-try.

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Leader 9.0

Leader 9.0By Andy Adams

In the case of baking a cake, Betty Crocker and Julia Child both start off with the same eggs, sugar and flour, but the results can be very different. Naval architects, designers and engineers in the boat business also have many of the same ingredients, but the trick is to make the cake unique and desirable.

With a huge history of innovative design in boatbuilding, Jeanneau brings the sort of skill and artistry to their boats that can set them apart. Their new Leader 9.0 model is a case in point.

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Ask Andrew – How to hire a boat repair contractor

hiring a contractorBy Andrew McDonald

A recent conversation with a fellow contractor got me thinking: With all of the information out there, including: Websites showing repairs, YouTube tutorials, Instagram pages and snapchat streams – let alone books, magazines, service manuals, and years of practical experience – how does a boat owner know which method(s) are ‘right’, who to trust, and who to hire to do the job? In short: How do you find and select a contractor?

Unfortunately, most people are forced to hire a contractor due to a circumstance where something has broken or failed, or the task...

Read more about hiring a contractor...