Pinging the unknown - RadarSunshine flooded the waters separating California’s Catalina Island from Channel Islands Harbor, and Capt. Tom Petersen, skipper of the well-equipped Sea Ray 55 Sundancer Valkyrie, was leading a small flotilla when an unexpected fog bank quashed visibility. While Valkyrie carries the latest Raymarine kit (Petersen is a Raymarine Pro Ambassador), including a 12 kW, six-foot, open-array high-definition radar, Petersen’s companions weren’t electronically fortified.  “I sat behind the other boats, watching them on my radar and maintaining radio contact,” said Petersen. 

 

Boaters who prefer to be on the hook, such as ourselves in our Islander 36 sailboat Holole’a, greatly extend their cruising experience. There are many more bays and nooks and crannies available when using the anchor. And it is free! However, the one big issue is electrical power. The boat has to be self-contained for storing electrical power (batteries), recharging the batteries, and providing 120 Volt electrical power (main engine with alternator or dedicated genset). Solar panels can help recharge batteries also.

Most boats use deep-cycle batteries for the house battery system. These are batteries that can tolerate hundreds of cycles of a 50% discharge. Without getting too technical, they are generally robust batteries of lead-acid, gel-cell, or AGM (absorbed glass matt) construction. The common physical sizes for 12 volt systems can vary from Group 24 (common car size), to golf-cart 6 volt batteries (connect 2 in series for 12 volts) up to massive and very heavy 4D and 8D. Battery banks can be added in parallel for more capacity.

Clean ElectronicsWith built in functions for radar, weather, chart plotters, engine data, and radio controls, boat owners are constantly touching their on-board electronics. Also, many boats with a more open design get a lot of salt spray on their dash as well. Shurhold Industries offers tips on how to properly clean a boat's electronics. 

Boating Paint

The Interlux® Boat Paint Guide has gone digital with the launch of a free app for Apple® IOS and Android smartphones and tablets, designed to make it easy to access Interlux product information and select the correct  Interlux paint system.

Convenient, Cool and Low-cost!

From simple organizational Apps for your smart phone to complete wireless devices and systems, there are a rapidly growing number of products available to the average boater today. 

As more boaters integrate their personal wireless devices with their cruising life, the market for marine mobile devices and applications increases.  The plus to this trend is that there are so many new and powerful options available to all level of boaters.  The minus to this trend is that there are so many options!


I was delighted to be invited to Gothenberg, Sweden at the end of June where Volvo Penta hosted an exclusive new product media introduction with a careful selection of  approximately 50 marine journalists from 14 different countries including Argentina and Brazil from South America. There were just three journalists from North America, and I was the only one from Canada – very flattering!

It used to be that “all the comforts of home” meant an easychair, a pipe and the newspaper. Today, the easy chair is an office chair and the pipe is gone, no matter what we could have put in it. The poor old ‘paper’ newspaper has been replaced with an electronic version that carries pretty much all the same stories, plus streaming video, the ability to search, cut ‘n’ paste things you want to keep and stories that you can forward to friends and colleagues.

Last year in Canada nearly 28 ½ million of us were online at least once a month, almost 83% of the population.  Canada has just over 18 million people who are subscribed to Facebook.  With stats like these, it’s no wonder that boaters have started to ask themselves: How is it possible to take the online experience onboard their boats? Traditionally boats have been a safe haven from the hustle and bustle of life. It’s a chance to unplug and unwind, to break the connection with the office and with the electronic world.

Why these acronyms should ring a bell. Communication is of the utmost importance when spending time on water; if anything goes wrong you want to make sure that you can alert someone close to your vessel to say that you are in need of assistance or that you are in danger. Using your cell phone on the water simply doesn't cut it. Cell phones do not provide the reliability that is needed on the water; coverage areas are different for each provider, signal strength is limited (or non-existent) when you are not close to shore.

There has been a real change in the focus and direction we’ve seen in marine electronics in recent years. Gone are the standalone equipment pieces, replaced by multifunction devices capable of “talking” to the other electronic devices on board your boat. To get first-hand information on what is really happening in the field, we traveled to CMC Electronics Esterline and spent the morning with Lead Technical Service Representative, Lorne Spence.

Destinations

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After months of planning my trip to Prince Edward Island in my CL16 open sailing dinghy Celtic ...
Bridgetown, Barbados:With just four days to go before the start of the 2017 Mount Gay Round ...
The first time we sailed to Madeira we wondered if the island had vanished. Or at least that's how ...
A year ago, it’s quite possible that if someone gave me an outline of Canada and asked me to ...
You've all heard of the “Backpacker's Guide to Europe” and the “Hitchhiker's ...
We were cruising for two weeks in Gwaii Haanas. Spread out among three boats, (a Campion, a ...
When we (an Ontario couple) both raised sailing on the Great Lakes and Lake Simcoe,  decided to ...
I was ruined...completely and utterly ruined. At the young age of 22, my very first trip to the ...

Story by Sheryl Shard • Photos by Paul and Sheryl Shard

The first time we sailed to Madeira we wondered if the island had vanished. Or at least that's how it appeared. Actually, it didn't appear. Not when we thought it should have.

That was in 1991 before the days of affordable GPS. On that first voyage, we were relying on a sextant, SatNav and dead reckoning. By our calculations, we were five miles off a massive mountainous landform in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

Read more of the The Madeira Archipelago....

 

Lifestyle

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This picture is of the vessel Puffins II a 1947 30' Taylor Craft. This vessel has been the pride of ...
This shot came to us via Cat Ward of Toronto, although it was her friend Laurie who took it from ...
“This is in Shoal Channel off the town of Gibsons BC. We are awaiting the start of a second ...
When the three day weather window we needed to cross to the Bahamas opened up, we were ready to ...
Hello Photo of the Week enthusiasts and welcome to a superb album to kick off 2017.
You can’t possibly pack in more national history associated with a yacht club than what you ...
Adamant 1 has had a busy month. We only stayed in Mobile long enough to get the mast put up and get ...
Wow you take good shots. We’re delighted with all the input, but please don’t slow ...
This story comes to us from Chelsea Ellard, aged 12 of Thunder Bay Ontario.     ...
It’s nothing short of spectacular, this view of Willemstad’s waterfront from the stone ...

Armdale Yacht ClubBy Katherine Stone

You can’t possibly pack in more national history associated with a yacht club than what you can find on Deadman’s Island in Nova Scotia. This is what Halloween legends were made of, as it was not uncommon once upon a time, to have an arm appear out of the ground in winter with the remainder of the poor skeleton not being reunited with its appendage until the spring thaw.

Many years after the Micmacs discovered Melville Island, the spot they called “end of the water,” the site was used for storehouses and then was purchased by the British, where a prisoner-of-war camp was built to house captives in the Napoleonic Wars and then later during the War of 1812.

Read more about Armdale Yacht Club...

 

Boat Reviews

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The Rossiter 23 Classic Day Boatis both a logical extension of the Canadian-built Rossiter line and ...
It's rare for Canadian Yachting magazine to report on the same boat twice, but that is how ...
When French naval architect Philippe Briandand the Jeanneau design team started working on the ...
Canadian Yachting magazine readers will certainly be familiar with the Cruisers Yachts line of ...
You can count yourself lucky to be able to go for a sail on Lake Ontario in mid-October when the ...
We met the new Cruisers Yachts 54 Cantius under almost ideal circumstances, on the beautiful Trent ...
The Chris-Craft Scorpion 210F is a sport boat with a unique combination of a midship motor and an ...
There must be a healthy market for the perfect 30-foot cruiser/racer – the boat that combines ...
At the last Miami International Boat Show, we had the pleasure of interviewing Delphine Andre, ...
In today's world marketplace choices abound. In some way, every manufacturer tries to make their ...

Vanquish 24 RunaboutBy Andy Adams

Big, elegant, and capable

Families with young people who are seriously into waterskiing or wake boarding face a difficult choice: Buy a dedicated tow sports boat and make the kids happy or buy a more traditional family boat and make everyone comfortable.

In our opinion, the Vanquish 24 Runabout offers up a big, elegant, and capable solution that could make everybody happy. This is not a cheap solution, but it's an impressive one. Last August, we traveled to Gravenhurst, Ontario, and got our first look at the Vanquish 24 Runabout, tied up at Muskoka Wharf Marine. One glance told us this was a special boat.

Read More of the Vanquish 24 Review.....

Marine Products

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Ally and Roy Way live on their sailboat in Vancouver. They had purchased a couple of electric bikes ...
Cranchi, a prestigious Italian leading name in pleasure crafts has officially designated Poliseno ...
Discover Boating Canada recently launched a new Boating Safety App. We are pleased to let our ...
Whether it’s dock lines on either a power or sailboat or running rigging, wearing grooves in ...
There is growing interest all over the country in offshore distance racing and naturally having the ...
Now this sounds like a bright idea! Halifax-basedCanada Rope and Twine Ltd has announced the launch ...
My copy of Northwest Boat Travel Guide just arrived. This time of the year is the perfect time for ...
While many boat owners simply choose not to venture out after dark, there are occasions when you ...
Vidas Stukas of the Royal Victoria Yacht Club has always experimented with his sail boats to ...
In the December issue of Canadian Yachting, we review the new Cruisers Yachts 54 Cantius. Cruisers ...

Seamasters Inflatables

Always a major exhibitor at the Halifax International Boat Show, Seamaster’s sales manager Dave Trott tells us they will have several news products on display including the new Stingray 206cc and the 186cc.

Seamaster Services of Dartmouth is a diversified company with roots in the marine safety business. Over the years they have expanded from liferafts to inflatable boats, as a Zodiac dealers, and now sell and service an extensive line of fibreglass and inflatable boats including Grady-White and Stingray.

Read more about Seamasters....