Dragonfly250Nov2By Steve Killing

If you have been a faithful reader of Canadian Yachting, this boat will not appear new to you. I reviewed it in June, 1989, and Paul Howard sailed it across our pages in a performance review in January, 1990. Since my review, over 50 boats have been built. The reason the Dragonfly returns to CY is a very significant design change.

If you ask a multihull enthusiast to point out the worst things about a monohull, he will bark out, "Too much heel, not enough speed." The monohull diehard will fight back with "Oh, yeah? Better than a multihull with not enough heel and too much beam."

The arguments are normally harmless enough, but Paul Countouris, builder of the Dragonfly, found that they were affecting business. The beam of his 25-footer was too much for many marinas and yacht clubs to swallow. With dockage at a premium in many locations, there was simply no slip space for a small boat with a 20-foot beam, and that was limiting the Dragonfly's market to boaters content with hanging off a mooring can, where they could find one.

A swing-wing catamaran

Countouris got mad, and then he got busy. He devised a system to allow the beam of the boat to be reduced to nine feet, six inches when at the dock - or, more correctly, while approaching the dock. An ingenious hinge in the crossbeams allows the two amas (outriggers) to swing back and nestle alongside the main hull. Because the hinge is slightly angled, the amas swing down as they move aft and thereby lift the main hull. With more of the outriggers immersed in the water, dockside stability is maintained.

Listening to Countouris' description of the process, I was skeptical of the practicality of the system, even if the theory was sound. How do these arms actually swing, and how much effort does it take?

Single-line control

This is the part I like the best. To swing the amas back while returning to dock, the sails are lowered and the auxiliary outboard fired up. Two line stoppers concealed in the cockpit coaming are released and the retaining pins are pulled (they're there as a back-up measure to prevent an ama from accidently retracting, should the control line break, while the boat is sailing). The drag of the water on the amas push them back, lifting the main hull. The water does all the work! To return the boat to its normal sailing condition, the lines are released while the boat is stationary and the amas float up and out to their normal position. Even while stationary, the amas can be positioned easily by loading the control lines onto the cockpit headsail winches.

In its original configuration, the Dragonfly could be converted readily to trailering by detaching the amas. In the new configuration, the amas still quickly detach, reducing the beam to about eight feet.

This Canadian builder has solved one of the major drawbacks of owning a multihull in a crowded marina. With this modification the class has been officially accepted at several yacht clubs that had formerly rejected the boat previously. Seven of the new versions have been sold across North America to date, and more are underway.

Originally published in Canadian Yachting's February 1991 issue.

Specifications

LOA            25 ft. 3 in.

Beam            19 ft. 8 in.

Draft            4 ft. 7 in.

Weight             1,480 lbs.

Sail Area             311 sq. ft.

To see if this boat is available, go to http://www.boatcan.com for listings!

 

Destinations

  • Prev
Long popular with New England and St. John area boaters, Passamaquoddy Bay is too often overlooked ...
We did breakfast yesterday in the Greek port of Piraeus, just outside Athens:strong coffee, crisp ...
After much speculation Prince Harry finally popped the question to American actress and longtime ...
Last January we ran a short piece on the motor boat A Great Story which had been restored by the ...
The Moorings has just announced the launch of its newest Caribbean destination, Antigua. 
Toronto sailor and former RCYC coach/sailing instructor Ryan May is now a US coast guard captain ...
Just before the weekly party at Shirley HeightsSunsail staffer Chris Donahue conducts our chart ...
Chartering in the Caribbean conjures up images of turquoise sea, palm fringed beaches and great ...
Since anyone who opens an independent bookstore is at least as brave as a small boat shop owner, I ...
You’re on your way east to the 1000 Islands or the Trent-Severn. By entering north of Prince ...

The Middens of Galiano Island

By Catherine Dook

We motored our way into Montague Harbour along a twisted channel with our engine muffled by the leaning trees.

“This is peaceful,” I told my husband, John.

“Look,” I pointed to an eagle sitting on the top of a tree overlooking the channel entrance like a sentinel giving permission for us to pass. Dignified, unruffled, his impassioned gaze noted and then dismissed us, as uninteresting and perhaps unworthy. I was tired. We’d pulled up anchor at Portland Island that morning, and the grind of the diesel engine had worn me down.

Read More of the Middens of Galiano Island.....

 

 

 

 

Lifestyle

  • Prev
Rossiter is a Canadian builder in Markdale, Ontario that builds a nice fleet of rowboats and small ...
Welcome to Photo of the Week 2018. If you are not familiar with this wonderful feature (What???!!!) ...
Living the dream! Longtime CY staffer and now blogger Lynn Lortie with her husband Pat left Midland ...
For our last Photo of the Week in 2017, I have picked some nice shots we received – one from the ...
Your boat is tucked away for the winter, but there may still be a few un-invited guests.
In the world of yachting, it is increasingly becoming the case that Canada is no longer the small ...
Ho-ho-ho. Our Photo of the week comes from Sunday’s Santa Parade. Clowning around was Paul ...
This Photo of the Week sequence from Chris Chahley and Kathy Coyle explains the whole boat thing. ...
The off season is suddenly upon us. Yikes! We need your photos more than ever to keep us thinking ...
One of our most enthusiastic contributors, Rob Dunbar sent us this photo from Halifax.   ...

 

 

Cruisers Yachts Cantius 50

Cruisers Yachts Cantius 50By: John Armstrong and Andy Adams
Photos: Cruisers Yachts Inc.

Almost a decade ago, Cruisers Yachts Inc., launched an entire line of express cruisers called “Cantius” (named after company owner KC Stock’s grandfather) that began with the 48Cantius then came the 54, the 60 and now the Cantius 50. In the fall of 2017, we will be at the debut of the 42 Cantius at the Fort Lauderdale International boat show.

These designs have a strong family resemblance withhandsome and distinctive linesand with a design philosophy that you could say, pioneered the new version of the express cruiser. 

Read more of new Cruisers Yachts Cantius 50.....

 

 

DIY & How to

  • Prev
Water has a funny way of making its way into a boat: through through-hulls, stuffing boxes, leaks, ...
 Since the initial article of this column we have identified a wide range of apps and ...
Since the initial article of this series we have looked at the iPad and its use as a marine ...
The moment we all dread. It’s a warm sunny day and you’re out for a cruise. Suddenly ...
For most of us – this is the time to make the most of the boating season – launch and ...
Question: Is it possible to mount, protect and charge your iPad during marine navigation. ...
  Is iNavX the superlative marine navigation app?    
Question: Can I buy generic automotive parts or products for my boat, or should they specify ...
  There is a good deal of hesitancy and lack of understanding as to whether an iPad can ...

Marine Products

  • Prev
Sirius Signal held a product information session for interested parties prior to demonstrating ...
Safety at Sea Courses, in my opinion are a must for all offshore racers. I would also recommend the ...
Just 10 shopping days to Christmas, so what to get for the boater who has everything? How about a ...
On board many pleasurecraft, only the compass is more neglected and taken for granted than the VHF ...
I am fortunate to have the ability to work from just about anywhere. A cellular signal and a Wi-Fi ...
Out here on the West Coast with boats in the water year-round, there is one constant activity and ...
As I sit looking out my window at the snow that is slowly piling up it is easy to be downtrodden by ...
In the last edition of this column we took a close look at iRegatta and the advantages it can bring ...
With all the devastation in the eastern Caribbean a natural question to ask is ‘is our boat in that ...
During the heat of summer, many boat owners turn on their air conditioning units. Whether portable ...