sail-catalina_375-largeGerry Douglas, the chief designer for Catalina, has hit a home run with the new Catalina 375. It is a fact: they have regrouped and rethought out the concept of a solid family cruising yacht that provides great features, value and performance. Filling the niche previously held by the Catalina 36, this new boat is a product of obvious experience and input from owners and the Catalina design team.

Swans Marina recently sold our test sailboat; when we arrived to do the review, Bernie Luttmer – the affable and passionate owner – raved about this new boat. Yacht broker John Bedford too was excited; their enthusiasm was warranted.

What's striking from the get go is how good looking the low profile deck and robust hull are and the solid sailing capabilities it demonstrated during our test sail. Seeing the boat on the hard first allowed us to really see what was under the waterline.

Instincts told us that the lead shoal draft keel and big three-bladed prop would impact the boat's performance and there would be some disturbances around the rudder. Our instincts were wrong.

We sailed hull number 4 on a day that provided good test conditions: relatively flat water and winds reaching 10 knots from the southwest that allowed us to put the boat through its paces. The hull shape proved its value and the boat did track well up wind. The in-mast furling system from Selden did not take away from the power and shape of the mainsail. The 130 genoa performed well too. The vertical battens did their job and the leach of the main was not falling off (typical of earlier days of this rig application). Testing boats like we do allows us a perspective on what really would help performance; in this regard we would definitely opt for the adjustable jib leads. Moving the leads back allowed much better performance and trim up wind allowing the genoa to drop inside the lifelines and set up perfectly. Performance measurements showed us easily hitting 5 knots in 40 degrees apparent in 8 knots of breeze. Nice!

Above decks, the boats visibility for steering was excellent. We sailed with full tops and covers. Despite the reality that most would remove the middle section, I would consider retrofitting this to include a window to increase visibility of the main in all conditions. The boat was easy to steer from the side and there was tons of space aft of the wheel. We really liked the centralization of all the electronics, engine and stereo controls on the steering pedestal; everything was close at hand – no need to glance aft or off to one side for adjustments or confirmation. The cockpit table is huge when folded out and the cockpit itself is deep, safe and large. Storage is far from lacking here; there's lots of it in the lockers accessible from the cockpit. Dropping in generators, air conditioners and extra equipment would be a snap.

We were also impressed with the Selden furling spar. The rig is well done with solid rigging and chain plates. A twin backstay adjusts the rig easily and allows for a perfect unobstructed entry to the swim platform. Closer inspection below showed us the robustness of construction. The mast is deck mounted and backed up by a mast support that is perfectly tucked inside the head.

Control lines were led aft to jammers and cleats and also easy to access. Single handling this boat would be a snap; the addition of a standard electric winch to starboard was a nice bonus. Sheet bags were standard allowing easy stowage underway. The traveller was forward of the dodger and easily trimmed with the standard mainsheet configuration.

Moving forward we were surprised with the room between the lifelines and shrouds making the side deck a dream to navigate. The front anchor locker was large with twin anchor capability. Again one feature we would add is a wash down forward. It's a nice feature to have.

Below decks, there is a real surprise. The main salon is just huge. The folding table concept typical of the older Morgan Out Island series tucks nicely with its stainless leg system against the forward bulkhead. A folding standard seat easily stowed aboard makes the huge living space happen. To starboard, a neat double seat with a table can be converted effortlessly to a couch. The entertainment system on the starboard bulkhead is easily viewed. The openness of the space is a welcoming feeling and gives the impression you are in a boat that's three feet longer.

The nav station and its related electrical/electronic panel is tucked neatly to port, aft of a three seat settee. A hidden chair flips out easily for seating. The electrical system and wiring panels are well done and labelled. The table is adequate for our paper charts. The galley just starboard of the companionway stairs is functional and well done. Nice cupboards grace eye level and there is enough counter space. The U-shape is perfect for a cruising-focused boat like this one. There is plenty of room for an optional refrigerator but clearly what's there is sufficient for most.

We would also deem the head as 'extra large'. A big shower and solid amenities are standard. There's great access to the plumbing fittings through the vanity. Under power, the 40 HP Yanmar pushes this boat effortlessly, backed up by the robust three-bladed prop that bites well in forward and reverse. All in all, the Catalina 375 is another winner in this year's crop of new boats. It is great value and no doubt will live up to the tradition of longevity and value offering Catalina is known for.

By John Kerr

To see if this boat is available, go to www.boatcan.com to check listings!

Destinations

  • Prev
In the 1920s, a small cove in Canoe Bay was used as a shipping point and safe-haven for rum runners ...
Here’s an update from Caroline Swann with some news for the adventurous types who may be heading to ...
The New Glasgow marina is located about six miles up the East River of Pictou in the heart of the ...
The British Virgins took a huge hit last fall from Irma. Boats were stranded on the shore by the ...
Located about half way between Shediac and the Miramichi on New Brunswick’s Acadian Coast, the town ...
Suddenly the once forsaken city of Hamilton, Ontario is booming for at least two good reasons.
The Salty Dawg Sailing Association (SDSA) invites all sailors to join a cruising rally from the ...
Long popular with New England and St. John area boaters, Passamaquoddy Bay is too often overlooked ...
We did breakfast yesterday in the Greek port of Piraeus, just outside Athens:strong coffee, crisp ...
After much speculation Prince Harry finally popped the question to American actress and longtime ...

 

How to be as Polite as a Canadian at Gulf Island Marine Park Anchorages

Gulf Island Marine ParkStory and photos by Catherine Dook

One summer I sold ice cream and knick-knacks at Montague Harbour Marina. I was standing behind the counter one day, when the phone rang. “There’s a boat at anchor in the middle of the bay that’s been playing loud music for three hours,” complained an irate-sounding male voice. “Can you make them stop?”

“Um, no,” I replied. “The marina has no jurisdiction over the anchorage. Besides, my only weapon is a till.” The man hung up on me.

Now when you think about it, you can understand why the poor fellow was annoyed.

Read more about the Gulf Island Marine Park.....

 

 

 

Lifestyle

  • Prev
Don’t miss this brilliant photo double header
In honour of Launch Day, our POTW this time comes from Wendy Loat in Port Credit. This shot, taken ...
Our favorite, Man-O-War Cay, is home to the Albury Boat Building empire. They have been building ...
On the Easter Weekend, the Sidney North Saanich Yacht Club from Vancouver Island, had its first ...
We were finally able to get a SIM card and data plan on our phone Monday morning. We could now ...
It’s Friday afternoon at the Newport Yacht Club in Stoney Creek, and that can only mean one thing - ...
As things are always better in the Bahamas, especially during Canadian winters, so too are things ...
We were all set with this week’s POTW when a real stunner came in as part of a story on the Blind ...
Have your say. Send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need ...
When I was about ten years old I starting racing sailboats on Cape Cod and the sound of the wind ...
Canadian Yachting Digital May 2018

 

Dufour 412

Dufour 412By: Katherine Stone

One often asks of a winning achievement or a fabulous design, could it have possibly been done better? The engineers at Dufour Yachts and the Felci Yachts Design group asked that question and listened carefully to suggestions from owners of the earlier, award-winning Dufour 410- one of Dufour’s most successful 12-metre boats. Not only did Dufour make the 412 more attractive and modern, but alsoincorporated amenities that are usually only reserved for larger boats.

We sailed the boat on a gusty, chilly, late autumn day out of Whitby, Ontario, on Lake Ontario, and she handled very well in 20 knotbreezes and three- to four-foot swells.

Read more about the Dufour 412.....

 

 

DIY & How to

  • Prev
Pyrotechnic distress flares have been around for decades, while electronic strobe distress flares ...
In the early spring, just after launch, with the hustle and bustle of engine checks, antifouling, ...
All engines, including marine engines (inboards, outboards and stern drives) have many moving parts ...
Most of us don’t give a second thought to our sacrificial anodes – those curious knobs of raw metal ...
I once heard an argument at a yacht club. Two old salts, patiently itching to let go lines and ...
In this time of boat show afterglow, many boaters are counting the days until launch. 
This one-day course consists of both theory and practical demonstration sessions, is designed to ...
Water has a funny way of making its way into a boat: through through-hulls, stuffing boxes, leaks, ...
If you walk the aisles at a boat show, visit a marine store, or stop in at a repair shop, you’ll ...
 Since the initial article of this column we have identified a wide range of apps and ...

 

Pyrotechnic Distress Flares vs. Electronic Distress Strobes

Pyrotechnic Distress Flares vs. Electronic Distress StrobesBy Andy Adams

Pyrotechnic distress flares have been around for decades, while electronic strobe distress flares have only been introduced in the last couple of years - and they aren't Canadian Coast Guard approved for use in Canada, at least not yet.

But which one is best? And the more important question is: When should you signal for help?

When the authorities do a vessel inspection on the water, they are looking for equipment that is in compliance with the regulations such as lifejackets, bailing buckets, sound signaling devices, and so on.

Read more about Pyrotechnic Distress Flares vs. Electronic Distress Strobes...

 

  

Marine Products

  • Prev
Industry Firsts Include Direct Injection and Integrated Electric Steering System
Verviers, Belgium, 18 May 2018 — Mercury Marine, the world leader in marine propulsion technology, ...
Again, we return to the beginning. We started this column with a look at marine navigation for ...
Ga-Oh (spirit of the winds in Algonquin) creates bags and other items from re-purposed sails.
The 2018 Northwest Boat Travel Guide just arrived. This time of the year is the perfect time for ...
We are all looking to gain a little more time these days, and technology is often the route we ...
While they are no longer a part of the CPS Flare Program, Fogh Boat Supplies and Fogh Marine, both ...
We have all had the experience of heading down below on a nice boat only to encounter an unpleasant ...
Starting from the top. If you partake in any winter activities, you have probably heard that your ...
Last year when this column launched a good deal of time was spent understanding global satellite ...