Shark250Nov23When George Hinterhoeller designed the Shark in 1959, he was looking for a boat that would "go like hell when the wind blew". Growing up in Austria's Salzkammergut region, Hinterhoeller was used to light displacement fin-keelers: fast, responsive and exciting.

The few sailboats he found on Lake Ontario when he emigrated to Canada in 1952 had heavy displacement hulls. They were ponderous and had a bad habit of hobby-horsing in the rough Lake Ontario chop.

This young builder/designer was also bored by their performance. Announcing that he could build a boat that would sail circles around the rest, he retired to the shed behind his Niagara-on-the-Lake home and built Teeter Totter, a hard-chined 22-foot sloop made of plywood. This was the forerunner of the Shark, and when the breeze blew, it did go like hell. Its designer loved it and so did his friends.

There was an immediate demand for the nimble little boat 35 years ago, so that winter Hinterhoeller increased the design length to 24 feet and began building plywood Sharks in his shed. Hull number five was made for Bill O'Reilly who demanded that his boat be built of a substance relatively new to boatbuilding at that time: fibreglass. O'Reilly even offered to teach Hinterhoeller how to work with this new material. With glass, it took 18 man-hours to produce a hull, instead of the 128 hours devoted to a wooden hull. Better still, the glass boats were virtually maintenance-free. That made the Shark the affordable yacht and soon Hinterhoeller and his design were on their way to international success.

Since then, more than 2,500 Sharks have taken their place in the fleet, both in North America and in Europe. It rapidly became the biggest one design class on the Great Lakes, and today there are active groups on the east and west coasts, and in Montreal and Windsor. About 500 Sharks sail the large lakes of Austria, Switzerland, Germany and the waters of the Swedish archipelago.

There have been changes since Hinterhoeller first designed the boat, but all are cosmetic. The narrow hull, straight stem, long flat-run aft, fin keel and elliptical spade rudder help this racer to climb easily over its bow wave to achieve speeds in excess of 10 knots. The six-foot beam and doghouse accommodate a vee-berth and two quarterberths with sink, stove and ice box, making it a pocket cruiser with sitting headroom. It draws less than four feet, making it an ideal boat to tuck into anchorages denied to deep draft boats.

The Sharks success is due to its early racing record. In 1960, Hinterhoeller crewed to George Steffan, later the president of Mirage Yachts, in the Freeman Cup. They cleaned up with three first using brisk 18-knots winds to put a leg between them and their nearest competitor in each race. In the 1963 Freeman Cup, the Shark did it again. For small boats the course was from NOTL to Rochester, N.Y., 80 miles along the south shore of Lake Ontario. Back then, there were no spinnakers of genoas on the rig and the boat was sailed with main and jib only.

"We thought our biggest competition would be the Thunderbirds," Hinterhoeller recalls. "But after the first surf, we knew that there would be no contest. We barreled down the course in seven hours, 44 minutes."

In 1963, using a spinnaker on a close reach across Lake Ontario, Sid Dakin, on of the early Shark owners, sailed the Blockhouse Bay race from Toronto to Olcott, N.Y., with an adrenaline-pumping average speed of 10.2 knots, beating the 56-foot Innisfree on a boat-for-boat basis. Sidís speed boggled the minds of sailors unaccustomed to semi-displacement hulls. Racing boats come and go, but the Shark remains. With its swept-spreader rig and planing abilities, it is still an up-to-date racer. As with its low-aspect 7/8ths rig and heavy keel, it has a sea kindliness and seaworthiness that match its speed in a breeze.

Hinterhoeller admits that the Shark's scantlings are better suited to a tank, but the proof of his wisdom in over-building the hull has been longevity. Virtually all of the 2,500 boats built in the past 35 years are still sailing and many of the first hulls off the line are winning their share of races.

The Shark is seen sailing happily in all major cruising waters, but some owners have taken them much farther afield. In 1972, Clive O'Connor, with his wife and two year-old, and guitar sailed their N from NOTL, Ont. to Melbourne, Australia. They arrived in good form, still speaking to each other and their boat, at last report, was still being used for research on Australia's Great Barrier reef.

Randall Peart sailed his Shark from Ohio to Lake Erie and then the Bahamas, then back to Miami. From Miami, he sailed to his native England where he spent the winter before returning to North America by way of the Canaries. On his return, he reported no structural damage and no bulkheads adrift, but he did install a new set of gudgeons to replace the worn ones.

More recently, Bob Lush added a foot to the stern of his Shark to bring it up to the 25-foot size limit for the OSTAR single-handed transatlantic race. Lush's biggest problem was getting stuck in the doldrums for too many mind-numbing days.

The Shark is a forgiving boat which makes it appealing boat for novices, but with 14 control lines, there are more than enough things to do for expert racers. An active class association tightly controls the racing in the fleet and ensures that all boats have the same minimum racing weight. Sharkscan is the class newsletter and is an excellent resource for sailors looking for a used boat, sails or equipment. The association is active at the international level, national and regional levels, giving Shark owners who are not a member of a local fleet a point of contact and an active racing programme. In addition to regular club races, there are provincial and national regattas each year. The highlight each season are the Worlds, a seven race series held in Europe or North America.  

To see if this boat is available, go to http://www.boatcan.com for listings! 

Lifestyle

  • Prev
With old boats every repair seems to uncover something else needing attention.  Removing the ...
We admit it, this Photo of the Week shot was just too cute to resist even though it was blatant ...
Reader Lorraine Gentleman took some liberty with our request for Photo of the Week shots from the ...
This afternoon portrait of her son enjoying a snooze in a pretty unlikely spot comes to us from ...
I've been cleaning dresser drawers for space and came across this 1979 LYRA t-shirt. This was my ...
Our Photo of the Week comes from one of our CY team members who writes “This is my son and his best ...
This boat carries the distinction as the last boat to leave the C&C Custom shop in Oakville ...
We crossed Lake Ontario from Oswego with a minimum of fuss and did a little happy dance when we ...
Our Photo of the Week comes from Mark and Lisa Harris who winter in Vancouver, Washington and spend ...
I am new to boating. Bought a 2019 Ranger Tug in April followed by taking a short boating course ...

DIY & How to

  • Prev
Since the late 19th century, a debate has raged on the relative merits of diesel fuel over ...
This bag does more than hold your anchor and rode in one tidy little pile. After you’ve anchored ...
Purchase your copy of the BRAND NEW Ports Georgian Bay 2020 Edition at the Toronto International ...
The boat was put on the hard for this winter and were going to follow along with Graham as he ...
In this part, we’ll delve deeper into the other parts of the boat found below the water line: the ...
I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve told my children to wash their hands. I remind them ...
The new editions of PORTS Cruising Guides, from the publishers of Canadian Yachting will be ...
As the seasons change and we move from warm summer into cooler fall, many fanatic boaters ...
On the Friday before a weekend with a gorgeous forecast, I heard on the news that a boat had ...
A reader suggested we take a look at anchors. Anchoring seems simple enough. A weighted hook with a ...

Diesel Fuel MaintenanceSince the late 19th century, a debate has raged on the relative merits of diesel fuel over gasoline. In more recent decades, that argument has included boat manufacturers, and increasingly, individual boaters. As I pass through boat yards in the spring or fall, I’m sure to hear a comment or two (sometimes ruefully, other times with great joy) of the merit of a particular engine or fuel source.

Increasingly, diesel engines are praised for their long-life, ease of maintenance, compact design, reliability and safety, and rate of combustion. As well as cruisers and trawlers, many sailboat manufacturers in particular have chosen to install diesel engines. 

Read more about Diesel Fuel Maintenance........................

 

  

Beneteau Flyer 32By Andy Adams

Summer sun boat! The handsome new Beneteau Flyer 32 is all about entertaining and the bow area is one of the main attractions. It's a wide shape forward with a huge anchor locker and opening centre section in the railing that invites you to beach the boat and go swimming. The bow is really one giant sun bed area with armrests that fold down and head rests too, for fall-asleep comfort. 

 

 

Read more about the Beneteau Flyer 32....................

 

Dufour 460By Katherine Stone

When one does an October yacht review on the Great Lakes you can never be sure of what kind of weather you will get…. and did we ever luck out! A beautiful sunny day with a high of 31 degrees and a perfect 8-10 knot breeze with light chop made for a champagne sailing day. Lucky for me we were at Swans Yacht Sales located in the Whitby Marina on Lake Ontario, trying out the Dufour 460 Grand Large, a flag ship for the midrange Dufour boats. With an overall length of 46’5” and a hull length of 44 ‘, this boat is majestic, not only in size, but also in elegance with timeless and contemporary style. 

Read More about Dufour 460..................

Destinations

  • Prev
Boom & Batten Restaurant is suspended over the water adjacent to the Songhees Walkway and ...
Provincial Boat Havens are those special places to drop anchor in British Columbia’s West Coast and ...
NW Explorations, a Bellingham, Washington-based yacht charter, brokerage, and marine services ...

Moorings In BrazilWith an increasing amount of interest in South America as a charter destination, The Moorings has responded with a new base in Paraty, Brazil. Surrounded by towering jungles plummeting into the waters of Baia Carioca, this charter cruising region features bays peppered with islands and world-famous beaches.

Centrally located between Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, Paraty (pronounced “Para-chee”) holds the key to many natural wonders you can only discover by boat.

Read more about Moorings' Brazil Charters......................

 

Marine Products

  • Prev
Since the days of the astrolabe, sailors have looked to the skies to determine the weather. If only ...
Since 1984 PORTS Cruising Guides have been the cruising boater's essential companion. But now PORTS ...
Canada’s largest independent fiberglass boat builder, Campion, has launched Muskoka, The M26 is 8.4 ...
It is not often I get to drive the newer model of something I own. Most of the time the model I own ...
Good news cruisers, it’s coming in early Summer 2020 – PORTS Rideau Canal and Lower Ottawa River ...
Few things are as frustrating to a boat owner as being becalmed or running out of fuel—or both. If ...
One of the biggest complaints we hear from our readers is ‘why we don’t run more new products’. ...
Every cruiser in the region has used it for years, but now there’s a brand new edition of the ...
When you visit the Toronto Boat Show, come to the Canadian Yachting booth (#1741), trial a pair of ...
With the Davis Scrubbis Underwater Hull Cleaning Kit it's easy to rid a boat of algae, grass, and ...