Open 40 By Steve Killing

If you followed the drama of the 1998-99 Around Alone race with its host of mast failures, rudder problems and detailed accounts of human suffering (the most dramatic being Isabelle Autissier's capsize and rescue), then you will know there is nothing trivial about this contest. It is a brutal, sometimes insane endeavour. And yet, Canadian Derek Hatfield is gearing up, with enthusiasm, for the September 2002 start of the next race. Much like those who climb mountains or trek to the arctic, for Hatfield the task seems less extreme if you plan for it in logical steps.

Hatfield has some of the longest-range plans I have seen. The construction process began about 12 months ago in a small shop in New Brunswick and only proceeds when the funds are available. But planning began long before the building began. A passionate sailor for over 20 years, Hatfield got seriously into short-handed racing in 1993 with his entry in the Lake Ontario 300 aboard the J92 Gizmo. Success in the 1995 Bermuda One Two and the single­handed transatlantic race in 1996 boosted his confidence. So it didn't seem that big a leap to plan for the Around Alone.

Hatfield chose designer Bob Dresser of Hingham, MA to draw up this 40-footer with a no-nonsense dinghy hull, typical of the boats used for the event. The bow and stern are vertical and the aft 70 percent of the boat is the shape of a shallow bowl with highly flared topsides. Selecting the beam was a major decision for this project. Although increasing the beam benefits stability, there is a distinct safety disadvantage - a greater tendency to stay inverted after capsizing.

Having seen numerous photos of inverted boats from recent ocean events, sailors are starting to realize that most sailing yachts are stable upside down. Once the heel angle exceeds the limit of positive stability, which for Hatfield's boat can be categorized as heal thy (above 120 degrees), it will invert and stay inverted. Therefore, a solution must be on hand to re-right the boat. Dresser has done three things to give Hatfield a better chance of winning and surviving: he has narrowed the beam (for comparison the Group Fi not 40-footer designed for the same race is more than a foot wider than the 13-foot beam Dresser has drawn), added more camber to the deck, and a canting keel. These three factors reduce the inverted stability of the boat. The greater the camber in the deck and the narrower the beam, the more chance there is of rolling upright. In order to force the boat to return to upright, the keel can be canted 34 degrees to one side with the use of hydraulics. This off-center weight will re-right the boat.

With the severity of the wind and wave conditions in the southern ocean, these safety features may even help Hatfield win the race - if he can stay upright, he can finish. But there a re more positive design features that add to performance. The canting keel will be cocked t o windward while sailing upwind to add to the stability of the boat without resorting to water ballast. The sail plan is huge and includes provisions for a reaching spinnaker; that means more speed upwind and reaching.

The interior is, of course, simple. It 's a big boat for one person and there is, naturally, an aversion to adding weight. A simple pipe berth on either side provides a spot for resting. The focal point of the interior is the central navigation station. Computers, autopilot, radios, emergency communication equipment, and weather fax will dominate this hub of the boat. My guess is Hatfield will spend most of his time here - eating, planning, sleeping and staying in touch with the rest of the world.

The hull construction uses E-glass and Kevlar, CoreCell and West System Pro-Set epoxy. The builders will use a high-temperature post-cure to increase the strength of the laminate.

Hatfield knows the realities of boat construction and, consequently, is reluctant to peg a launch date, but when pressed he settled on "in about a year." This will give Hatfield plenty of time to log some offshore miles on his new vessel and get his campaign in order. It is said that slow and steady wins the race - there is a certain amount of truth to this in the case of the Around Alone. Careful preparation and organised fundraising are key to completing this sailing marathon - that, and a fast boat. Based on this formula, Canada will have a contender on the line for the next Around Alone race.

Originally published in Canadian Yachting Regatta 1999 issue.

Specifications
Length 40'
Beam 13'
Draft 9' 8"
Displacement 9,000 lb.

Destinations

  • Prev
Toronto sailor and former RCYC coach/sailing instructor Ryan May is now a US coast guard captain ...
Just before the weekly party at Shirley HeightsSunsail staffer Chris Donahue conducts our chart ...
Chartering in the Caribbean conjures up images of turquoise sea, palm fringed beaches and great ...
Since anyone who opens an independent bookstore is at least as brave as a small boat shop owner, I ...
You’re on your way east to the 1000 Islands or the Trent-Severn. By entering north of Prince ...
I have lived in Ontario my whole life but have only recently had the pleasure of visiting the City ...
My trip to the Northwest Passage started long before I boarded the flight to Kangerlussaq with ...
During the summer of 2016, my wife and I cruised through the North Channel in Lake Huron on our ...
It’s like we’ve waved a magic wand and disappeared into a picture perfect painting, our ...
The Schooner Cove Yacht Club is situated between Nanaimo and Parksville, on the east coast of ...

Cowichan Bay to Genoa Bay – Almost the Gulf Islands

Cowichan Bay to Genoa Bay – Almost the Gulf Islands

 By Catherine Dook

“So you’re going offshore to Genoa Bay,” said an old salt at coffee that morning. Genoa Bay was 15 minutes away from our homeport of Cowichan Bay and hardly counted as offshore, but it was our first destination that fall. The fog had socked us in all that morning, so John and I drank coffee and gossiped with the neighbours while waiting for the weather to lift. We’d provisioned with cans of chilli, a sack of apples, and tanks full of water. We’d tested the engine and the anchor winch. We were ready.

Read More of Cowichan Bay to Genoa Bay.....

 

 

 

Lifestyle

  • Prev
One of our most enthusiastic contributors, Rob Dunbar sent us this photo from Halifax.   ...
Checking back into the US was quick and painless. We made the call to Customs but we needed to ...
Two-hundred-year-old homes are what ghost stories are made of, and Beaconsfield Yacht Club (BYC) ...
This time our photos come from Gimli where Katie Coleman Nicoll was on the scene. She’s an ...
Recently we celebrated our country’s 150th anniversary, and in true form thousands of ...
   We left off Part 1 at the year 1914, and will here pick it back up, running through ...
This week’s POTW comes from across the pond. Who knew we had a European audience   ...
Here is our boat anchored at Hockey Stick Bay. We live in a beautiful country.     ...
Michelle Jacques of Cambridge ON share this memory of her adorable pooch. “This is Frodo. ...
  Our 150 year history began in 1867, but Canada was no stranger to watercraft prior to our ...

 By: Katherine Stone

Do you know how many boaters you run into while standing in the lift lines of Blue Mountain and the surrounding private ski clubs? Quite a few! Start some conversations on the ski lifts and you might be surprised how many avid boaters you can meet.

Many who boat say that winter sports are just there to pass the time until the ice clears and you can get your boat launched and start boating again. As a ski instructor, you tend to meet even more interesting boaters… Read more about the Reef Boat Club ....

 

 

 

DIY & How to

  • Prev
 Since the initial article of this column we have identified a wide range of apps and ...
Since the initial article of this series we have looked at the iPad and its use as a marine ...
The moment we all dread. It’s a warm sunny day and you’re out for a cruise. Suddenly ...
For most of us – this is the time to make the most of the boating season – launch and ...
Question: Is it possible to mount, protect and charge your iPad during marine navigation. ...
  Is iNavX the superlative marine navigation app?    
Question: Can I buy generic automotive parts or products for my boat, or should they specify ...
  There is a good deal of hesitancy and lack of understanding as to whether an iPad can ...
‘Top dead centre’ is the position of the wheel that allows you to steer your boat ...

Marine Products

  • Prev
With all the devastation in the eastern Caribbean a natural question to ask is ‘is our boat in that ...
During the heat of summer, many boat owners turn on their air conditioning units. Whether portable ...
A milestone has been reached. The new D13-1000 sees Volvo Penta move into the 1000hp marine leisure ...
  Still looking for the perfect slip for your boat? Look no further!    
Canadian Yachting traveled to Newport to review and sea trial the new MJM 35z.     ...
Erik Pawson Of Watertight Boatworks here in North Vancouver, BC, is really passionate about the ...
Hydro Clean Hull Wash is Canada's first automatic, mechanical hull wash system and the company has ...
For 2017 there were a total of 31 events planned and 2 were cancelled for a total of 29 events. All ...
When Terry Conrad, of Conrad Marine, offered me ride in a brand-new Sea Fox 288 Commander that he ...
EMCS Industries Ltd. has a unique antifouling system that’s quite clever and incredibly ...

By Owen Hurst

Since the initial article of this series we have looked at the iPad and its use as a marine navigation instrument. We have discussed its functionality, available apps, relevant hardware and compared it to traditional charplotters. This focus on iPad led one of our readers to an interesting question that we have yet to address.

Question: Why has the focus been solely on the use of iPads for marine navigation rather than Android devices?

Read More Going iPad or Android.....