Hanse 400 - it has it allBy John Kerr

It's classic, comfortable well-designed and easy to sail. From the minute you step onto the deck of a Hanse you're immediately struck by the fact that they have employed a design team with its act together. They are a team with a clear goal in mind and a design pedigree second to none. Sailing a Hanse is a dream - and if you're a regular CY reader you already know how I feel about the Hanses: I am one of the converted.

These boats are fast-cruising lifestyle yachts that are comfortable, responsive and easy as punch to sail.

Hanse has it all. That's why I couldn't wait to see the new Hanse 400 at the boat show. Even when only seen on the hard it looks like the latest triumph and I can't wait to sail her. Stay tuned for the on-water test once the ice is out of the harbour.

In the meantime, here's a preview.

From stem to stern you can see evidence of the effort and style provided by design team Judel and Vrolijk. This boat is the latest offering in the "cross over design". They have accomplished and even exceeded their mission.

Like its sister ships, this boat show specimen looks to be fast and easy to handle - her speed no doubt the result of builders' efforts to stop at nothing to save weight.

Tapered mast heads are standard and provide further evidence of their attention to this detail, but you can also lighten the hull further with the optional epoxy layup technique that decreases overall weight by a further 4%. Our call on this is to go for it; when it comes to maintenance issues like osmosis this hull design has its advantages.

Hanse 400 - GalleyThe attention to derail continues topside. The split or divided bow pulpit is a nice touch, very safe but practical. The layout of the anchor roller juxtaposed near the standard furling gear is well done and neat. They have even designed the bow assembly to take a gennaker pole.

Above the waterline the deck is balsa cored fiberglass. Below the waterline the hull is solid fiberglass.

All lines are led aft. Typical of the Hanse fleet, the no-nonsense self-tacker is present, making those tight tacks a breeze in any channel or harbour. Cruising and entertaining with a self-tacker on board just makes life so much easier for those new sailors and guests and makes single-handling a breeze when your guests have deserted the ship.

All the instrumentation is easily visible from a variety of crew positions and the console placed amidships complements the open cockpit beautifully.

A final nice touch is the adoption of the new trend to larger leather-wrapped steering wheels. It's a feature we absolutely love. The only improvement we might suggest is a folding wheel to give a bit more wiggle room for loading and unloading at the dock.

If the Hanses we've seen so far are any indication, design and flexibility are two words that epitomize these boats. The cabin layout offers further evidence of both those characteristics. We identified up to five configurations, allowing for one or two stern cabins and a diagonal or traditional fore cabin. The diagonal layout allows for a more open feel and there is tons of headroom. Most designers let you choose your upholstery. With the Hanse you can also pick the wood colours: they offer a choice of cherry or mahogany.

Hanse 400 - cabinetryThe galley is bright and efficient with gimbaled oven/stove combination and tons of storage. The navigation center is also well-placed with overhead lockers a neat touch. Accessing the engine room is easy and we particularly like the fact that the companionway steps are mounted right on the access door - easily lifted and balanced with gas pressure struts.

While I admit I can hardly wait for the snow to go so I can put her through her paces, even seeing her under the lights at the boar shows convinces me that my theories about these boats and their design team are still valid.

When it comes to a boat created to combine flexibility and innovative design, it seems to me that the Hanse 400, just like every other Hanse I've tested so far, has it all.

Originally published in Canadian Yachting’s April 2006 issue.

Photo Captions
Photo 1 - Hanse has it all.
Photo 2 - The galley area of the new Hanse 400 is bright and efficient
Photo 3 - With Hanse you can pick between cherry or mahogany for the cabinetry.

Destinations

  • Prev
The Moorings has just announced the launch of its newest Caribbean destination, Antigua. 
Toronto sailor and former RCYC coach/sailing instructor Ryan May is now a US coast guard captain ...
Just before the weekly party at Shirley HeightsSunsail staffer Chris Donahue conducts our chart ...
Chartering in the Caribbean conjures up images of turquoise sea, palm fringed beaches and great ...
Since anyone who opens an independent bookstore is at least as brave as a small boat shop owner, I ...
You’re on your way east to the 1000 Islands or the Trent-Severn. By entering north of Prince ...
I have lived in Ontario my whole life but have only recently had the pleasure of visiting the City ...
My trip to the Northwest Passage started long before I boarded the flight to Kangerlussaq with ...
During the summer of 2016, my wife and I cruised through the North Channel in Lake Huron on our ...
It’s like we’ve waved a magic wand and disappeared into a picture perfect painting, our ...

Our Top 5 Caribbean Destinations

Shards Top 5 Caribbean DestinationsBy Paul and Sheryl Shard

Do you ever dream about traveling by boat on sparkling tropical seas as winter sets in at home and the weather turns colder and grayer?

We used to.

Then, almost 30 years ago, we decided to take a big step and do our first bareboat charter in the Caribbean to escape the snow and experience a mid-winter sailing adventure in Paradise. (We were novice sailors then.) My husband, Paul, and I shared a boat with friends on that trip, which made it pretty affordable, and we discovered that winter sailing in the Caribbean didn't have to be merely a dream after all. We got hooked.

Read more of the Shards Top 5 Caribbean Destinations...

 

 

Lifestyle

  • Prev
This Photo of the Week sequence from Chris Chahley and Kathy Coyle explains the whole boat thing. ...
The off season is suddenly upon us. Yikes! We need your photos more than ever to keep us thinking ...
One of our most enthusiastic contributors, Rob Dunbar sent us this photo from Halifax.   ...
Checking back into the US was quick and painless. We made the call to Customs but we needed to ...
Two-hundred-year-old homes are what ghost stories are made of, and Beaconsfield Yacht Club (BYC) ...
This time our photos come from Gimli where Katie Coleman Nicoll was on the scene. She’s an ...
Recently we celebrated our country’s 150th anniversary, and in true form thousands of ...
   We left off Part 1 at the year 1914, and will here pick it back up, running through ...
This week’s POTW comes from across the pond. Who knew we had a European audience   ...
Here is our boat anchored at Hockey Stick Bay. We live in a beautiful country.     ...

This brief history of the early days of the LaHave River Yacht Club (LRYC) gives an idea of the DIY enthusiasm of the club’s founders and the unpretentious love of boating motivated them.

The LaHave River Yacht Club is located on the West side of the LaHave River, 12 kilometers south of the town of Bridgewater. Founded with 50 members who held their early get-togethers at the old Drill Hall in Bridgewater, since many of them were also in the Reserves. The first slate of officers was: Commodore - Ed Goudey, Vice Commodore - Fred Surbeck, Rear Commodore - Captain Malcolm Wilkie, Treasurer - Macgregor Miller, Secretary - Victor Killam.

Read More about LaHave River Yacht Club...

 

 

 

Covey Island Boatworks

Covey Island Boatworks It could be said that Covey Island Boatworks put Canada on the map during the early days of wood/epoxy composite boatbuilding. Today the company has diversified into fiberglass commercial fishing vessels, selling inflatable boats and hybrid and electric propulsion systems from facilities in Lunenburg, Riverport and Liverpool. Things were pretty basic back in 1979 when the yard was established on Covey Island, one of the LaHave Islands in Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia, by John Steele and two partners.

Read More about Covey Island Boatworks....

 

 

 

 

DIY & How to

  • Prev
Water has a funny way of making its way into a boat: through through-hulls, stuffing boxes, leaks, ...
 Since the initial article of this column we have identified a wide range of apps and ...
Since the initial article of this series we have looked at the iPad and its use as a marine ...
The moment we all dread. It’s a warm sunny day and you’re out for a cruise. Suddenly ...
For most of us – this is the time to make the most of the boating season – launch and ...
Question: Is it possible to mount, protect and charge your iPad during marine navigation. ...
  Is iNavX the superlative marine navigation app?    
Question: Can I buy generic automotive parts or products for my boat, or should they specify ...
  There is a good deal of hesitancy and lack of understanding as to whether an iPad can ...

Marine Products

  • Prev
Out here on the West Coast with boats in the water year-round, there is one constant activity and ...
In the last edition of this column we took a close look at iRegatta and the advantages it can bring ...
With all the devastation in the eastern Caribbean a natural question to ask is ‘is our boat in that ...
During the heat of summer, many boat owners turn on their air conditioning units. Whether portable ...
A milestone has been reached. The new D13-1000 sees Volvo Penta move into the 1000hp marine leisure ...
  Still looking for the perfect slip for your boat? Look no further!    
Canadian Yachting traveled to Newport to review and sea trial the new MJM 35z.     ...
Erik Pawson Of Watertight Boatworks here in North Vancouver, BC, is really passionate about the ...
Hydro Clean Hull Wash is Canada's first automatic, mechanical hull wash system and the company has ...
For 2017 there were a total of 31 events planned and 2 were cancelled for a total of 29 events. All ...